Daniel Moos

Faculty

Associate Professor in Education

For more information, please see my website:

http://homepages.gac.edu/~dmoos/

My interest in teaching began when I was an undergraduate at Amherst College (Amherst, MA) and participated in a student teaching program (TEACH!). The experiences gained from working with elementary through high school students strengthened my interest in the profession of teaching. Following graduation from Amherst College, I taught at an elementary and middle school located in Bethesda, Maryland for four years. My primary responsibility during those four years was a 6th grade homeroom teacher, which entailed teaching core courses, including history, mathematics, and language arts. While I was earning my MA and PhD at the University of Maryland, I taught at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. At the undergraduate level, I taught an introductory course on cognitive development to pre-service teachers. At the graduate level, I taught a master's level course (EDHD 499A: Technology-Based Learning Environments) to cohorts of elementary, middle school, and high school teachers enrolled in the M.Ed. program in Human Development.

I joined the Education Department at Gustavus Adolphus College in the Fall of 2007. My responsibilities include teaching two courses, Educational Psychology and Educational Technology, and supervising and mentoring student teachers. I am also involved in research that, in many ways, shapes my teaching. My primary research interest concerns the cognitive and metacognitive processes involved in learning with computer-based environments for different developmental groups, including middle school, high school, and undergraduate students. However, as a former middle school teacher and as one currently teaching undergraduate students, I believe that a research agenda examining the complexities of learning processes needs to also consider various motivational constructs. Based on this belief, I have a conducted a series of studies which have examined metacognitive, cognitive, and motivational processes in learning with computer-based environments. Currently, I am examining the relationship between cognitive load and self-regulation. These studies have been published in a variety of peer-reviewed journals (i.e. Contemporary Educational Psychology, Instructional Science, Computers in Human Behavior) and presented at a number of international conferences (i.e. American Educational Research Association, European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction, International Conference of Learning Sciences, Cognition and the Web).

Education

B.A. Amherst College; M.A. University of Maryland; Ph.D. University of Maryland



Courses Taught

Current

EDU-241 (Educational Technology) and EDU-330 (Developmental and Educational Psychology)

Past
Synonym Title Times Taught Terms Taught
EDU-241Educational Technology182013/SP, 2012/FA, 2012/SP, 2011/FA, 2011/SP, 2010/FA, 2010/SP, 2009/FA, 2009/SP, 2008/FA, 2008/SP, and 2007/FA
EDU-330Developmental and Educational Psychology122013/SP, 2012/FA, 2012/SP, 2011/FA, 2011/SP, 2010/FA, 2010/SP, 2009/FA, 2009/SP, 2008/FA, 2008/SP, and 2007/FA