Section 10.A: The Major in Music, Formal Declaration, Areas of Emphasis

Music Student Handbook

Section Contents

The Major in Music

The study of music is an integral part of the liberal arts tradition. At Gustavus Adolphus College, the Department of Music offers historical, theoretical, pedagogical, and performance courses that promote integration of musical knowledge, sensitivity skills, and critical thinking. In addition, the Music Lab (FAM 304), which contains MIDI workstations, offers students the opportunity to experience benefits of modern technology in music study. Gustavus Adolphus College is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM). Our affiliation with this association is given due consideration in decisions affecting the College requirements for graduation.

Gustavus Adolphus College offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in Music and in Music Education. Students may also choose to pursue honors programs, church music studies, or other interests. Music majors are identified by their enrollment in the music theory and music history sequence, successful completion of the Audition for a Music Major, and continued registration in performance studies. Registration in both lessons and ensembles is required for each semester in residence (See: The Music Major in Section 3).

Music majors find employment in areas as diverse as computer software development, instrument design engineering, and historical research. Many jobs allow individual enterprise while others are in traditional roles: composer, arranger, editor, conductor, performer, teacher, recording and sound engineer, piano tuner/technician, music therapist, music librarian, acoustic engineer, organ builder, instrument repair person, music retailer, community arts manager, etc, Possible places of employment include public and private schools, colleges and conservatories, radio and television networks/stations, churches, community and professional choirs, bands and orchestras, theatres and dinner theatres, ballet and opera companies, military music ensembles, recording companies, publishing companies, concert management firms, recreation associations, music libraries and museums, rehabilitation agencies, retail music stores, etc. In most areas of employment, a bachelor's degree is sufficient for both entry and promotional opportunities in the field. The master's degree is often pursued in music education, performance, composition-theory, history and literature, church music, music therapy, and conducting. Advanced degrees are usually necessary for college teaching.

Potential music majors are encouraged to contact a department faculty member during their first year to discuss interests, plans, and scheduling. Study abroad is highly recommended as part of the undergraduate experience and may be considered and discussed with the advisor. Other career information is available through the campus Career Center (ext. 7586), including options for specialized internships and assistantships.

Formal Declaration

Students formally declare their intent to major in music by completing a Statement of Intent to Major in Music in Music Theory II (MUS 112) and by completing the Audition for a Music Major (normally at the end of spring semester of their first year). Music major status is then effective in the fall semester of the student’s sophomore year. At this time, the Music Lesson Fee is waived. Sophomore, junior, and senior music majors are identified by subsequent enrollment in the required core courses in theory and history, applied lessons, and appropriate ensembles. All music majors must register for a 0.25-credit ensemble every semester in residence, unless, through audition, are placed in one of the 0.13-credit ensembles. Those whose primary emphasis is in piano or guitar performance may satisfy part of the ensemble requirement as upperclassmen by completion of supervised accompanying, but are required to participate for at least one year in a conducted ensemble.

Audition for a Music Major

At the end of spring semester, first year students desiring to pursue a major in music or in music education play/sing an Audition for the Music Major. This is typically conducted at the time of the regular end of semester Performance Assessment/Jury. Students are expected to demonstrate their accomplishment to date in both technique and repertoire, giving evidence that they will be able to achieve the level of performance ability expected of music majors within the remaining semesters prior to their graduation. The faculty members hearing the audition are expected to sign off whether the student passes, must reaudition, or should pursue a different major. Students told to reaudition may do so at the end of the next semester. This audition evaluates the performance capability of the student on their primary instrument, and must be successfully completed before the student is admitted to 300-level lessons.

300-level Lessons

Sophomore Music and Music Education majors who have successfully completed the Audition for Music Major are expected to begin 300-level lessons on their primary instrument/voice. Students registered at this level normally receive a 45-minute lesson each week for 0.5 credit (instead of the standard 30-minute lesson for 200-level lessons). Hour-long lessons are standard for 1.0 credit. Students enrolled for 300-level lessons are expected to incorporate their studies in music theory and history/literature which are part of their curriculum as music majors into their applied lesson study. They are also expected to be making steady progress toward achieving the level of performance expected of a graduating music major. (Since registration for fall classes happens earlier in the semester than the Audition will, students who plan to major in music should register for 300-level lessons in advance. This registration will be reviewed and verified as appropriate in the fall by the Music Office.)

Areas of Emphasis

While the College does not offer specific programs in the following areas, students may elect to enroll in additional courses that provide foundations for continued study in specific music-related areas. As the College’s academic course catalog changes each semester, students electing to pursue specialized programs should carefully note changes in course offerings that may potentially affect the intended plan of study.

Arts Administration Minor

A minor in Arts Administration provides students with an introduction to the skill set required to effectively manage and promote pro- grams and institutions related to the fine arts. The Arts Administration minor offers a focus on organizational behaviors, marketing strategies, communication practices and resource management within the context of the fine arts. The minor is designed to expand on the In-depth knowledge students have acquired through majors In Art/Art History, Music or Theatre/Dance. The minor Is only available to students who are majors in one of these departments.
The minor consists of five courses:
T/D-260 Arts Management;
One course from: E/M-110, E/M-125, E/M-261, E/M-260, MCS-140 and MCS- 142;
Three courses from: ART-220, ART-255, CPM-117, COM-120, COM-231, COM- 237, COM-246, ENG-212, ENG-256, ART-268/368. MUS-268/368, T/D-268 and T/D-268/368 (Internships/career explorations to be arranged through the respective major department and in consultation with a faculty member).

Other courses in public discourse and communication, media, film, and psychology can strengthen your resumé.

Students are encouraged to consult the Career Center (ext. 7586) for information about internships, a Work Study assignment in the Office of Fine Arts, and other beneficial practical experience. Specific individual programs should be designed with the assistance of an academic advisor.

Music-Business

Gustavus does not offer a formal program in the joint fields of music and business. Students wishing to pursue a career in this field and graduate from Gustavus with a major in music should choose supporting classes that will prepare them for employment and/or continued graduate studies at an institution that specializes in music industry. Other options include an economics and management major with a music minor or a double major in Economics and Management and Music.

Music Major Courses (14.13 Credits): The complete course and credit listing is detailed in Section 3 under “The Music Major”

Additional Interest-Specific Courses

  • MUS 268, 368: Career Exploration, Internship (variable credit)

Recommended Economics and Management Courses

  • E/M 101: Principles of Macroeconomics (1.00)
  • E/M 102: Principles of Microeconomics (1.00)
  • E/M 130: Financial Accounting (1.00)
  • E/M 260: Marketing (1.00)
  • E/M 265: Business Law (1.00)

One may also elect to complete a minor in Management in the Economics and Management Department.

Students are encouraged to consult the Career Center (ext. 7586) for information about internships, a work-study assignment in the Office of Fine Arts, and other beneficial practical experience. Other courses in psychology and/or speech and communications may also be appropriate. Specific individual programs should be designed with the assistance of an academic advisor.

Music-Computer Science

Gustavus does not offer a formal program in the joint fields of music and computer science. There are courses, however, which may be taken to provide technical background for students with interests in software development and related fields. Students wishing to pursue a career in this field and graduate from Gustavus with a major in Music should choose supporting classes that will prepare them for employment and/or continued graduate studies at an institution that specializes in music industry. Other options include a Computer Science major with a Music minor or a double major in Computer Science and Music.

Music Major Courses (14.13 Credits): The complete course and credit listing is detailed in Section 3 under “The Music Major”

Additional Interest-Specific Courses

  • MUS 268, 368: Career Exploration, Internship (variable credit)

Recommended Computer Science Courses

  • MCS 121: Calculus I (1.00)
  • MCS 177-178: Introduction to Computer Science I-II (2.00)
  • MCS 256: Discrete Calculus and Probability (1.00)
  • MCS 270: Object-Orientated Software Development (1.00)

Students with extensive programming experience are advised to take MCS 270 as the single course most directly related to music software development. Additional coursework can be selected with the assistance of computer science departmental advisors. Furthermore, beneficial work-study placements may include the Music Lab, Academic Computing, or the Computer Science department.

Music-Theatre

Gustavus does not offer a formal program in Music Theatre. Students wishing to pursue a career in this field and graduate from Gustavus with a major in Music should choose supporting classes that will prepare them for employment and/or continued study at the graduate (or undergraduate) level. Alternatively, students may elect to major in Theatre and complete a minor in Music.

Music Major Courses (14.13 Credits): The complete course and credit listing is detailed in Section 3 under “The Music Major”

Recommended Courses in Theatre and Dance

  • T/D 101: Theatre Appreciation (1.00)
  • T/D 103: Beginning Experiments in Design (1.00)
  • T/D 105: Beginning Modern Dance (1.00)
  • T/D 106: Beginning Acting (1.00)
  • T/D 109: Beginning Jazz Dance (0.50)
  • T/D 110: Performance Practicum (variable credit)
  • T/D 221: Stagecraft: Lighting and Sound (1.00)
  • T/D 222: Stagecraft: Scenery and Costumes (1.00)

Additional Interest-Specific Courses

  • MUS 268, 368: Career Exploration, Internship (variable credit)

Other intermediate and advanced courses in specialized areas may be selected based on student interests and advising from the Department of Theatre and Dance. An additional opportunity for students interested in music-theatre collaborations exists in the various musicals staged on a bi-annual basis. Students may also elect to complete a minor in Theatre. Students are encouraged to consult the Career Center (ext. 7586) for information about internships, a work-study assignment in the Theatre department, and other beneficial practical experience. Specific individual programs should be designed with the assistance of an academic advisor.

Music-Therapy

Gustavus does not offer a formal program in Music Therapy. Students wishing to pursue a career in this field and graduate from Gustavus with a major in Music should choose supporting classes that will prepare them for employment and/or continued study at the graduate (or undergraduate) level. This academic plan has been quite successful for students in the recent past.

Music Major Courses (14.13 Credits): The complete course and credit listing is detailed in Section 3 under “The Music Major”

Additional Recommended Music Courses

  • MUS 268, 368: Career Exploration, Internship (variable credit)
  • MUS 280: Classical Guitar
  • MUS 282: Jazz Guitar
  • MUS 330: Vocal Techniques for Instrumental Majors (0.25)
  • MUS 331: Vocal Techniques for Vocal Majors (0.25)
  • MUS 332: String Techniques (0.25)
  • MUS 334: Guitar Techniques (0.25)
  • MUS 336: Woodwind Techniques (.025)
  • MUS 338: Brass and Percussion Techniques (0.25)

Behavioral Sciences and Education Courses

  • HES 234: Human Anatomy and Physiology I (1.00)
  • PSY 100: General Psychology (1.00)
  • PSY 224: Statistics and Research Methods I (1.00)
  • PSY 234: Developmental Psychology (1.00)
  • PSY 241: Abnormal Psychology (1.00)

Other courses in psychology and sociology should be selected in consultation with the Department of Psychology. Completion of a major in Psychology may also be appropriate. Additional courses in speech, communications, and theatre are advisable as well. These recommendations are made from a comparison of the Gustavus curriculum with that of another liberal arts institution that offers a Music Therapy program. Missing in the Gustavus curriculum is the component of specialized Music Therapy courses; these courses would be taken at an institution with a faculty and specialized program in the particular field.

Revised: September 2012