Faculty Shop Talks

 

Fall 2016 Schedule

Presenter: Paul Saulnier

Title: Joined at the Hip from Birth: A Story of Entangled Photons
Time and Place: September 16, 2016 at 4:30 pm in the Interpretive Center

Abstract:
Ever since the apple hit Isaac Newton on the head, scientists have wondered about the nature of the mechanisms that cause one object to influence the behavior of another more distant object.  Since Newton could not see a rope connecting the Earth to the Moon, he wondered how it was that the Earth changed the Moon’s motion.  What accounted for this seemingly “spooky action-at-a distance”?  Physicists eventually created models that did away with the need for any spooky influences and all was right with the world for over 100 years; until…  This Shop Talk, intended for a general academic audience, will explore the creation, manipulation, and spectral measurement of entangled photons that are both “spooky” and joined at the hip from birth.

 

Presenter: Laura Burrack

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Time and Place: October 7, 2016 at 4:30 pm in the Interpretive Center

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Presenter: Melissa Rolnick

Title:  MEISA" Movement - Exploration - Imagination - Sensation - Awareness
Time and Place: October 28, 2016 at 4:30 pm in the Interpretive Center

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Presenter: Annika Ericksen

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Time and Place: November 11, 2016 at 4:30 pm in the Interpretive Center

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Presenter: Lauren Hecht

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Time and Place: December 2, 2016 at 4:30 pm in the Interpretive Center

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Spring 2017 Schedule

Presenter: Jill Locke

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Time and Place: February 17, 2017 at 4:30 pm in the Interpretive Center

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Presenter: Maddalena Marinari

Title:  Caught between Two Worlds: Undocumented Italians in the United States

Time and Place: March 3, 2017 at 4:30 pm in the Interpretive Center

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Presenter: Eric Dugdale

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Time and Place: March 17, 2017 at 4:30 pm in the Interpretive Center

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Presenter: Suzanne Wilson

Title:  What Is in a Label?: A Comparison of the Colombian Paramilitaries and the BACRIM

Time and Place: April 7, 2017 at 4:30 pm in the Interpretive Center

Abstract: This presentation explores the social construction of criminality through comparing the Colombian paramilitaries (from their formation as a national confederation until their demobilization, 1997-2006) with the newer bandas criminales emergentes (BACRIM) or emerging criminal bands (2006-2016).  The Colombian government has viewed the BACRIM strictly as criminal actors while it provided the paramilitaries with legal protections as political actors.  Why are two groups that are both criminal and violent viewed so differently?  This presentation examines three areas that the Colombian government argues that the BACRIM differs from the paramilitaries: a) organized crime; b) violence; and c) links to the political sphere and civil society.  There are some notable differences between the two groups (e.g., the BACRIM are not mortal enemies of guerrilla groups, have not killed and displaced persons at the levels that the paramilitaries did, and lack the systematic links with politicians at the national level that the paramilitaries had).  While these distinctions are important, I argue that the BACRIM are akin to their paramilitary predecessors in several key respects.  Both groups have dominated domestic drug trafficking and been violent actors.  Like the paramilitaries, the BACRIM have maintained de facto control of many localities and worked closely with regional and municipal politicians.  Last, this presentation discusses the implications of viewing the BACRIM as criminals while treating the paramilitaries as political actors for Colombian politics and theories of criminalization.  Demonstrating criminalization processes’ selectivity and political roots, the differential labeling obscures the paramilitary’s criminality and their culpability for many deaths and massacres, while downplaying the BACRIM’s links to the political sphere.

 

Presenter: Brandy Russell

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Time and Place: April 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm in the Interpretive Center

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