Workshops and Activities

Sessions are at Noon and repeat at 1 p.m.

Sessions are at Noon and repeat at 1 p.m. and will not be online unless noted. Each day offers different sessions.

Wednesday, September 28, 2022 - Workshops and Activities
Location Activity/Workshop
 

Craving: What the Virtual World is Doing to Us & What We Can Do About It
Location: Jackson Campus Center, Heritage Banquet Room
Americans average 12 hours of digital electronic media per day. This “virtual world” of stimulation shuts users out of their natural, physical environment with a simple con: what you want is what you get. Algorithms use our behavioral data to reflexively predict what we will want ,to hook us into an endless cycle of craving. What can transactional analysis and Zen Buddhism tell us about our relationship with the virtual world? This presentation will teach you how to better understand yourself and the virtual world as well as what we can do about it. 

Presenter: Andrew Archer is a psychotherapist in private practice. He is a meditation instructor, author, and national speaker. Archer has held academic positions at the University of Wisconsin, Madison and is the owner of Minnesota Mental Health Services. He lives in Mankato, Minnesota where he teaches Zen meditation in the community, including to toddlers and preschool children.

 

Mental Health and the Visual Language
Location: Nobel Hall of Science, Room 1413
Kristen Lowe, department of art and art history at Gustavus, will present artworks on the subject of mental health made by students in her "day course." Each semester students collaborate to generate topics ("days") that serve as the conceptual launching pad for visual art projects they initiate during the semester. The individual student begins by creating artworks out of personal experiences and preferences. Students learn to identify how personal viewpoints are situated in larger political, social, religious and ethical contexts.

 Presenter: Kristen Lowe, associate professor of art and art history, Gustavus

 

The Other Opponent: Mental Health and Sports for Young People
Location: Fine Arts Building/Nobel Hall of Science, in Anderson Theatre
Intensive training, teamwork and leadership through the highs and lows of competition function to bring adolescents together across cultural and linguistic boundaries. However, the function of sports in young people's lives isn’t always positive. Although sport participation has the capacity to support young people as they navigate school, social relationships, and individual identity development, it also has also been shown to be associated with marked negative outcomes related to mood disorders, disordered eating, and decreased self-esteem. Further, the nuanced experiences of athlete mental health have been shown to differ based on individual identities, sport type, and systems of oppression that function in and through athletic institutions. Despite these negative outcomes, research has also identified factors that can be implemented to positively support athletes and their mental health and prevent negative outcomes for young athletes. During this workshop, panelists will discuss the modern and nuanced athletic experience, as well as specific and evidenced-based ways that the sport community can better support young athletes' mental health.

Facilitator: Emily Odermatt, graduate research assistant, Minnesota Child Welfare Training Academy
Presenters: Kari Eckheart, assistant athletic director and senior woman administrator in athletics; Brenden Huber, coach, Gustavus men's and women's cross country; Rachelle Sherden, coach, Gustavus women's volleyball. 

 

The Pandemic and Kids’ Mental Health – Building Resilience During and Beyond the Pandemic
Location: Nobel Hall of Science, Wallenberg Auditorium
The pandemic has taken a toll on the mental health of millions of children. We can’t always predict which kids will struggle long term. So it’s important to create opportunities for kids to talk about their pandemic – good and bad. Talking allows the opportunity to strengthen kids’ ability to cope with future adversity. In this interactive, multimedia session, Jeanne Blake, CEO of Blake Works, a leadership communication firm, will share excerpts of Blake Works’ online program“The Pandemic and Kids’ Mental Health,” which features children, parents and mental health experts. You’ll gain insight into how effective family communication can help children grow up emotionally connected and healthy.

View the Conversation Guide used during this workshop.

Presenter: Jeanne Blake is an executive advisor and author, and former medical television journalist. She is an honorary trustee at McLean Hospital, Harvard’s largest psychiatric teaching hospital. She has appeared on Oprah, The Today Show, and been featured on National Public Radio. Jeanne served as a member of the American Psychological Association’s Task Force on Girls and was a Kaiser Media Fellow in Health. She co-founded the Perfect Storm Foundation with author Sebastian Junger.

 

Yoga
Location: Lund Center Gymnastics Studio
"Our issues are in our tissues” is a common yoga adage, meaning that our emotional patterns live in our bodies. In fact, research on preventative health practices indicates that yoga reduces stress, anxiety and depression. In this practice we will cultivate mindfulness of the body and breath to release tension and create a sense of calm. This class is designed to be practiced in everyday clothing. Mats are provided. All physical abilities welcome. 

Presenter: Kelly Karstad. Kelly has worked in higher education for 10+ years and practiced yoga and meditation for longer. She is grateful to her teachers and the yogic and Buddhist paths for showing her how to be less of a jerk to herself and others.

 

Rejoice in Reiki
Location: Nobel Hall of Science, Room 1412
Reiki - Rei: means universe, Ki: means life force energy. Reiki is defined as an innate healing energy that rejuvenates tranquility for the mind, body and soul. This session will be a time to listen and learn more. Participants will not be receiving reiki during the session.

Presenters: Dee Langon and Jeana Thomas
Dwnell “Dee” Langon is a devoted father, light worker, visionary and Usui/Holy Fire III and Karuna Reiki master and teacher since 2020. Jeana Thomas is a Usui HolyFire Karuna Reiki master and teacher, healing yoga teacher, meditator, mindful mother and compassionate nurse. 

 

Youth, Trauma and Marginalized Identities Panel from the Practitioner Perspective
Location: Johnson Student Union, Alumni Hall
Therapists are on the front lines of aiding individuals with a variety of mental health disorders, including but not limited to depression, anxiety, personality disorders, substance use disorders, and trauma. In this era of the internet and social media we have psychoeducation and mental health resources at our fingertips, but how often do we get to hear first-hand experiences from professionals who work in our communities? Come learn about trauma, trauma informed care, and the impact of trauma from therapists who work closely with clients who identify as BIPOC and LGBTQ+. 

Facilitators: Amy Garibay and Demi Jones
Presenters: Tiana Fitzsimmons (MSW, LICSW), Karen Hernandez (MSW, LGSW), Laura Schultz (MA, MSW, LGSW)

 

Fostering Resilience through Music Creativity 
Location: Jackson Campus Center, St. Peter Banquet Room
With rapidly growing complexities and prevalence of trauma in the lives of youth, it is important to understand how to connect with them on a meaningful level that is non-threatening and supportive. This workshop will give an overview of how music is an important and transformational tool for working with youth who have experienced trauma, and it will deliver a practical and differentiated approach to using music creativity for healing and resilience. 

Presenter: Daniel Roeder is a 2003 Gustavus graduate in vocal performance. He holds an MA in music composition from the University of Iowa and an education specialist credential from California State University, Chico. He is a composer, performer and special educator as well as chief academic officer of the David Z Foundation, a music nonprofit the goal of which is to transform lives through the magic of music.

Thursday, September 29, 2022 - Workshops and Activities
Location Activity/Workshop
 

Helping Children Navigate Early Childhood Trauma Through Developmental Repair
Location: Jackson Campus Center, Heritage Banquet Room
Early relationships set the template for how children make sense of the world and support identity development. For most, these attachments set kids up for a healthy future. But when there is a disruption or trauma, children need their caregivers to provide the scaffolding necessary support development. Developmental Repair is a model of intervention that teaches young children to utilize adult relationships to meet social and emotional needs.

Presenter: Lauren W. Nietz, MSW, LICSW is the director of the United Health Training Institute at Washburn Center for Children where she uses developmental repair as a framework for training, consultation and psychotherapy for adults, children, groups, and families who are struggling with the effects of trauma. Lauren is a member of the school of social work community faculty at the University of Minnesota.

 

Introduction to MEISA: Movement-Exploration-Imagination-Sensation-Awareness
Location: Lund Center Gymnastics Studio
MEISA is a developing somatic and contemplative practice evolving out of a questing need to know, move and live more deeply in the authenticity of the body. Directed/sustained movement practice is aimed at cultivating mobility, sensory connection, physical expression, creativity and a deepening of embodied experience and knowing. This will be an active workshop of doing this gentle physical practice. All physical abilities welcome. This class is designed to be practiced in everyday clothing. 

Presenter: Melissa C. Rolnick, associate professor of theatre and dance, Gustavus. Rolnick's teaching and movement practice have been informed by dance, somatic, contemplative practice and movement research in many forms. She began developing MEISA as the recipient of the Frederick P. Lenz residential fellowship for Buddhist studies and American culture and values at Naropa University in 2015. She has a BFA from SUNY Purchase and an MFA from Mills College.

 

Gender, Race, and Identity: An Intersectional Approach to the Patient Experience
Location: Nobel Hall of Science Room 1413
This session will review core principles in applying a diversity, equity, and inclusion lens to enhance patient care, with a focus on child and adolescent populations and their families. Here is a link to the PowerPoint used during this presenation

Presenter: Dr. Qaadir (she/her) is a board certified child/adolescent psychiatrist who currently serves as the clinical consultant to diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) at PrairieCare. She treats patients with mood, anxiety, and trauma-related disorders in an interdisciplinary team setting. She completed her clinical training at Mayo Clinic Rochester and has worked at PrairieCare since 2016.

 

The Medicine Wheel: An Indigenous Tool for Everyone
Location: Nobel Hall of Science, Wallenberg Auditorium
Using personal storytelling, presenter Sabrina Mercedes will walk through the teachings of the medicine wheel. Participants will see how this tool might be applied in both a personal and professional setting. Gentle body movement and awareness will be integrated. All physical abilities welcome. No need to wear anything special.

Presenter: Sabrina Mercedes (they/she) is a Chicana artist, performer, and workshop facilitator. Sabrina uses personal storytelling to engage their community. Sabrina's motto for life is being comfortably uncomfortable in order to create non- judgemental spaces for social change.

 

Movement and Meditation Self-Care for a Busy World
Location: Johnson Student Union, Alumni Hall
Ironically, Western culture encourages both mental busyness (hyper-activity) and physical idleness (sitting at a desk all day). This psychological and physical detachment may create burnout, feelings of overwhelm, worry, loneliness, sadness, and disconnection from others. This workshop encourages practicing caring foroneself by incorporating holistic ways to calm one's mind and move one's body. This presentation will be interactive as we will take the time to meditate, move, and be mindful. All physical abilities welcome. No need to wear anything special.

Presenter: Lindsay Archer, LPCC, LADC is a psychotherapist in private practice at Minnesota Mental Health Services. She supervises clinicians and students preparing for licensure with a holistic perspective. Lindsay practices movement therapy, which is an innovative way to process psychological experiences by incorporating talk therapy with bodily movement. Lindsay lives in Mankato, Minnesota with her partner, Andrew, and their three young children.

 

Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine
Location: Nobel Hall of Science Room 2300
Can an ancient medicine influence modern health? Come learn about acupuncture and Chinese medicine with Dr. Cami Malinski-Gillett as she describes how traditional medicines can be a profound co-treatment for pain, emotions, and mental health. This session will be a time for listening and learning. No acupuncture or other practices will be administered.

Presenter: Dr. Cami Malinski-Gillett has an acupuncture practice in St. Peter,nb Wild Roots Acupuncture. She holds a doctorate in acupuncture and Chinese medicine, as well as certifications as a meditation and yoga teacher. She specializes in aiding patients not only in their physical and emotional complaints, but also in reconnecting with their own wisdom for healing. 

 

Rejoice in Reiki
Location: Nobel Hall of Science, Room 1412
Reiki - Rei: means universe, Ki: means life force energy. Reiki is defined as an innate healing energy that rejuvenates tranquility for the mind, body and soul. This session will be a time to listen and learn more. Participants will not be receiving reiki during the session.

Presenters: Dee Langon and Jeana Thomas
Dwnell “Dee” Langon is a devoted father, light worker, visionary and Usui/Holy Fire III and Karuna Reiki master and teacher since 2020. Jeana Thomas is a Usui HolyFire Karuna Reiki master and teacher, healing yoga teacher, meditator, mindful mother and a compassionate nurse. 

 

Noon: Body Reclamation 
Location: Fine Arts Building/Nobel Hall of Science, Anderson Theatre

Join DejaJoelle in gathering three embodied practices to communicate with, offer rest to, and reclaim your body. This will be a movement-oriented workshop. All physical abilities welcome. No need to wear anything special.

1 P.M.: The Garden 
Location: Fine Arts Building/Nobel Hall of Science, Anderson Theatre

The Garden is a multi-layered tool that helps you and others to locate yourself on a daily basis. This resource helps you to recognize when you may need to take intentional care of yourself or evoke an intervention.

Presenter: DejaJoelle is an African Centered - Healing Artist, Choreographer, Director, and Cultural Healing Curator. She believes Dance serves as our connection to ourselves, our communities, and our overall Divinity. DejaJoelle creates intentional spaces for Black, LGBTQ2, and Deaf community to discover their own practices toward Healing using Dance, Body Reclamation, and other Healing practices. As the world experiences collective hurt and grief, DejaJoelle trusts that our greatest act of REVOLUTION and REBELLION against hatred and corruption is Self-Love and Healing. As she refuses to fuel the fire of destruction and heinousness, she instead focuses her Art and energy on properly handling Black people who continue to be mishandled.