Announcement: Public Talk by Dr. Kirsten Tollefson, Michigan State University on HAWC: A New Gamma Ray Observatory to Study Nature˜s Highest Energy Particle Accelerators

Dr. Kirsten Tollefson (a Gustavus alum), Michigan State University will speak on, HAWC: A New Gamma Ray Observatory to Study Nature˜s Highest Energy Particle Accelerators on Monday, September 30th at 4:30 p.m. in Olin 103.

This talk will general audience discuss the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) experiment is currently under construction at Sierra Negra, Mexico and consists of a 22,500 square meter area of water tanks instrumented with light-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The experiment is used to detect energetic secondary particles reaching the ground when a 50 GeV to 100 TeV cosmic ray or gamma ray interacts in the atmosphere above the experiment. HAWC complements existing Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) and space-based gamma-ray telescopes with its extreme high-energy reach and its large field-of-view. The HAWC instrument will be used to study particle acceleration in astrophysical sources as well as search for more exotic phenomena such as dark matter annihilation and primordial black holes. I will present an overview of how HAWC works and what we hope to accomplish over the next few years.


Description

Dr. Kirsten Tollefson (a Gustavus alum), Michigan State University will speak on, HAWC: A New Gamma Ray Observatory to Study Nature˜s Highest Energy Particle Accelerators on Monday, September 30th at 4:30 p.m. in Olin 103.

This talk will general audience discuss the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) experiment is currently under construction at Sierra Negra, Mexico and consists of a 22,500 square meter area of water tanks instrumented with light-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The experiment is used to detect energetic secondary particles reaching the ground when a 50 GeV to 100 TeV cosmic ray or gamma ray interacts in the atmosphere above the experiment. HAWC complements existing Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) and space-based gamma-ray telescopes with its extreme high-energy reach and its large field-of-view. The HAWC instrument will be used to study particle acceleration in astrophysical sources as well as search for more exotic phenomena such as dark matter annihilation and primordial black holes. I will present an overview of how HAWC works and what we hope to accomplish over the next few years.

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PostedApr 17, 2019