Biology Department Faculty

Margaret Bloch Qazi
B.A., Wellesley; Ph.D., Tufts
Teaches: First Term Seminar, Invertebrate Biology, Entomology, Organismal Biology
Research Interests:
"I study insect reproductive behaviors and physiology using two model systems, the flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) and the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster). While males and females must cooperate to reproduce at all, there is also often conflict regarding how many progeny to produce, when to produce them, and who will fertilize the female's eggs. This tension between cooperation and conflict results in fascinating reproductive behaviors and physiology. While these types of male-female interactions have been documented in organisms ranging from primates to plants, insects present a particularly tractable study system. My research includes techniques and questions from the disciplines of animal behavior, physiology, genetics, development, and evolution.
Office: Nobel Hall of Science Rm. 329; 507.933.6287
Homepage: Dr. Margaret Bloch Qazi

Joel Carlin
B.S., University of North Carolina, Wilmington, Purdue University, Fort Wayne; M.Sc., Louisiana State University, PhD., University of Florida
Teaches: Biodiversity; Principles of Biology; Freshwater Biology
Research Interests: Geographic effects on living systems.
Office: Nobel Hall of Science Rm. 336; phone 507.933.6305
Homepage:
Dr. Carlin

Maureen Carlson
Technical Coordinator 
Office: Nobel Hall of Science Rm 232; phone 507.933.7334

Jeffrey Dahlseid Joint appointment with the Biology Department and the Chemistry Department
B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College; Ph.D., Northwestern University.
Teaches: Biochemistry; Cell & Molecular Biology.
Office: Nobel Hall of Science Rm. 208; 507.933.6129
Homepage: Courses and Research Opportunities

Eric Elias
B.S., University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; M.S., Minnesota State University, Mankato, MN
Teaches:  Coordinates & teaches Principles of Biology Labs; Coordinates and teaches Organismal Biology Labs;
Research Interests: The Role of 17a-ethynylestradiol and Tamoxifen on the Reproductive Development of Juvenile Rainbow Darters (Etheostoma caeruleum).
Office: Nobel Hall of Science Rm. 221B; phone 507.933.7329

Michael Ferragamo
B.A., Boston University; M.A., SUNY at Stonybrook; Ph.D., Brown University. 
Teaches: Cell & Molecular Biology, Human Anatomy, Neuroscience, Neurobiological Methods. 
Office: Beck Hall Rm. 247; 507.933.6369

Marilyn Frederick
Department Administrative Assistant  
Office: Nobel Hall of Science Rm. 223; phone 507.933.7333

Ngawang Gonsar
B.S., College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN; M.S University of Minnesota
Teaches: Labs for Principles of Biology and Cell and Molecular Biology; Coordinates and teaches labs for Organismal Biology.
Research Interests: Role of Nodal signaling in zebrafish neural tube closure.
Office:  Nobel Hall of Science Rm. 221H; phone 507.933.7047

Jon Grinnell
B.A., California Polytechnic State University; Ph.D. University of Minnesota
Teaches:  Evolution, Ecology & Behavior; Vertebrate Zoology; Animal Behavior; Evolution.
Research Interests:  I am interested in how the behavior of an animal is influenced by ecological and social factors, in the evolution and functional significance of bioacoustic signals, and in the coexistence of humans and other species. My current research interests include the social significance of roaring and other vocalizations in African lions; the social ecology of Chipping sparrows and other local species; and the landscape ecology of vertebrates in the Minnesota River Valley.
Office:  Nobel Hall of Science Rm. 328A; phone 507.933.7332
Homepage: Dr. Grinnell

Colleen Jacks
B.A., Gustavus Adolphus; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Teaches: Cell and Molecular Biology; Genetics; Molecular Genetics; Developmental Biology 
Research Interests: I am interested in gene expression and how gene expression is regulated.  We are using  ribosomal protein genes of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana in our investigations.  Ribosomes are found in three compartments of the plant cell - the cytoplasm, the plastid (e.g. chloroplast) and the mitochondrion.  All three types of ribosomes contain a unique set of proteins, mostly encoded by genes within the nucleus of the cell.  The genes encoding cytosolic ribosomal proteins are coordinately regulated, i.e. turned on and off together, in many organisms.  In plants, many of the ribosomal proteins are encoded by families of genes. We want to understand the role of each family member in the growth and development of the plant.  Currently, we are studying the ribosomal protein S15 gene family.  Data from the Arabidopsis genome project indicate there are five members of this gene family and cDNA/EST sequences are available for two members.  We are determining the expression pattern in different plant tissues and at different developmental stages for each of these family members using RT-PCR and have isolated a T-DNA insertion mutant for one of the S15 genes.

We are also investigating the function and expression of a gene known as H1flk3 linked to one of the S15 genes.  This gene of unknown function is one of three related genes isolated from the Arabidopsis genome; the other two genes are linked to histone H1 genes (H1flk1 and H1flk2).  We have isolated a T-DNA insertion mutant for the H1flk3 gene.
Office: Nobel Hall of Science Rm. 233; phone 507.933.7326

Cindy Johnson
B.S. Bemidji State University; M.S, Ph.D. Iowa State University 
Teaches: Conservation Biology
Research Interest: Cindy is interested in the ecology of bryophytes and pteridophytes. She is currently working on the population biology and reproductive ecology of a group of ferns called the moonworts specifically the phenology, longevity, and recruitment of moonworts. All moonworts have mycorrhizae in their roots and underground gametophytes which may play a significant role in the ecology of these ferns. Also some species of moonworts produce vegetative structures called gemmae on the roots which is unusual for ferns. Areas of interest include culturing these plants from gemmae and gametophytes and determining the relative importance of photosynthesis for the plants. 
Office: Nobel Hall of Science Rm. 332; phone 507.933.7043
Homepage: Dr. Johnson-Groh

Pamela Kittelson
B.A. Colorado College; M.A. Humboldt State University; Ph.D. University of California
Teaches: Ecology; Plant Physiology; Evolution, Ecology and Behavior (EEB); General Biology and Directed Research in Plant Ecology
Research Interests: I am interested in the ecology and evolution of plant populations. My recent publications focus on how the genetic architecture of lupine populations have been shaped by natural selection and reproductive events; I clarified mechanisms of evolution across small geographic areas. At Gustavus, my students and I examine interactions between plant and animal species, and we use a molecular tool called AFLP to measure genetic variability in oak and prairie species. Our work contributes to more thorough understanding of how populations respond isolated, fragmented landscapes. Finally, we also explore how the presence of invasive plants affects native species and ecosystems in Minnesota, California and Montana.
Office: Nobel Hall of Science Rm. 335; phone 507.933.7331
Homepage: Dr. Kittelson

John Lammert
B.A., M.A., Valparaiso; Ph.D., University of  Illinois. 
Teaches: Principles of Biology; Microbes and Human Health; Microbiology; Immunology 
Research Interests: Phenytoin, a commonly-used anti-convulsant drug, is known to have several side effects, including an altered immune system. In other organ systems, the drug has been found to bind to the glucocorticoid receptor, as well as to inhibit Ca2+ uptake. Both pharmacological actions are potentially immunosuppressive. In a mouse model, students are studying how phenytoin affects thymocytes and macrophages. 
Office: Nobel Hall of Science Rm. 221J; phone 507.933.7330

Sanjive Qazi
B.S. University of Sheffield, Sheffield, U.K.; PhD, CASE Bath University, U.K.
Teaches: Coordinates and teaches labs for Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbes and Human Health Labs
Research Interests: Signal transduction in the insect M. sexta.
Office:  Nobel Hall of Science Rm. 221D; phone 507.933.6319