Elementary and Secondary Education (EDU)

Academic Catalog: 2012–2013

  • Debra Pitton, Chairperson
  • Sidonia Alenuma-Nimoh
  • John Clementson (On leave, 2012–2013)
  • Rita Curtin (Visiting, Fall 2012)
  • Sharon Fitch (Visiting, Fall 2012)
  • Katrina Imison
  • Steve Jones (Visiting, Fall 2012)
  • Michele Koomen
  • Daniel Moos
  • Carolyn O’Grady (Director of International and Cultural Education, 2012–2013)
  • Andrea Rients (Visiting, Fall 2012)
  • Debra Sandquist (Coordinator of Teacher Admission and Field Experiences)
  • Jane Schuck (Visiting, 2012–2013)
  • Robert Shoemaker (Visiting, Fall 2012)
  • Amy Vizenor (Visiting, 2012–2013)
  • Valerie Struthers Walker

The Department of Education provides programs in teacher education that lead to licensure in teaching kindergarten, elementary school, middle school, and secondary school. Graduates of teacher education programs at Gustavus also qualify for graduate study. The College is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. Teacher education programs at Gustavus are approved by the Minnesota Board of Teaching. Students who complete Gustavus teacher education programs regularly pass all teacher licensure tests required by the state of Minnesota.

There are full-time faculty, one full-time coordinator of field placements and admission, and other faculty who serve the programs across the campus. The supervision ratio per supervising faculty member is low enough to provide weekly visits to students in the field. Teacher Education students work with youth and children across their years in college, including a full-time three-week experience to start the program, multiple and lengthy methods practice opportunities, and a studentteaching experience of at least fourteen weeks (560 hours).

Careful planning of a student’s education program is very important. Therefore, it is necessary that interested students make an appointment with the Coordinator of Admission and Field Experiences to enroll as early as possible in teacher education programs. Upon admission, each student will be assigned an advisor who should be consulted each semester before registration for classes.

The department supports students who wish to study and travel internationally. The department offers international student-teaching options in Spain, France, and domestic student-teaching options in Alaska and New York City. Students must apply and be accepted for these programs, and should consult with the Coordinator of Admission and Field Experiences early to be sure international study will fit into their program.

Field Experiences

Field experiences in our partner schools are required in many courses. Students are required to provide their own transportation to these sites.

Admission to Basic Programs

Students who wish to complete teacher education programs at Gustavus Adolphus College must file a formal application for admission and should contact the Coordinator of Admissions and Field Experiences to begin this process. The application process is initiated as part of the course EDU-230, Social Foundations of Education. Each semester, up to seventeen Elementary Education and seventeen Secondary Education students are selected for admission. Due to Minnesota State requirements, admitted education majors are assessed fees for particular aspects Elementary and Secondary Education of the program. These required fees are outlined in the Education Department Handbook.

In general, Gustavus cannot provide coursework for Secondary teacher licensure for individuals with undergraduate degrees from other institutions. Exceptions can be made through an agreement of the Education Department, the appropriate academic department(s), and the Registrar. In such cases, courses are accessed on a space-available basis.

Criteria for Admission to Basic Programs:

  1. Completion of 8 courses, including EDU-230 and EDU-268/266.
  2. No incompletes on record.
  3. No unresolved Individual Learning Plans.
  4. No grades lower than C– in the major, in any Education course, or in any Elementary endorsement course.
  5. Completion of at least one designated writing course with a grade of C or better.
  6. Approval by the department chair of the student’s major.
  7. Verification that the Minnesota Teacher Licensure Exam (MTLE ) Basic Skills Test has been taken.

Criteria for which relative performance will determine Admission Rankings:

  1. Successful completion of a supervised field experience in an elementary or secondary school (EDU-268 or equivalent experience approved.).
  2. A writing sample completed in a standardized session for all candidates.
  3. For Secondary Education students, two recommendations are required, one from a professor who has had the student in a class in the major and one from another faculty member not in the Education Department . For Elementary Education students, two recommendations are required from professors outside the Education Department who have had the student in class.
  4. An overall minimum GPA of 2.75.
  5. Personal interview with members of the Education Department admissions committee, including at least two faculty and at least one upper-level Education student.

Applicants will receive written notice of the formal action taken by the admissions committee and Education Department in the semester in which they apply and prior to registration for the next term. Admission to the program is required for enrollment in advanced level courses in the department. In the event that a student is denied admission to the program by the Gustavus Education Department, and is subsequently unsuccessful in appealing the decision within the department, the student may appeal to the an Academic Dean, who will ask for a written statement from both the student and the department prior to rendering a decision. The Dean’s decision will be final.

Professional Semester

To qualify for licensure in Minnesota, it is necessary to complete a semester of student teaching, which is available in a number of student-teaching locations in the Metro area, locally, and abroad.

Criteria for Admission to Professional Semester:

  1. Previous admission to Teacher Education Program.
  2. Completion of the required sequence of courses in the licensure programs.
  • An overall minimum grade point average of 2.75.
  • A minimum grade point average of 2.75 in the major.
  • No incompletes on record.
  • No unresolved Individual Learning Plans (APP, PBP).
  • No grades of less than C– in the major, in any Education class, or in any Elementary endorsement course.
  • Approval by the department chair of the student’s major.
  • Approval by the Coordinator of Admission and Field Experiences.
  • The Professional Semester is a fulltime commitment by the student. Participation in work or extracurricular activities will require a petition to the Coordinator of Admission and Field Experiences. Students pursuing multiple licensures or endorsements are required to extend their student teaching through the January Interim (EDU-394, EDU-395 or EDU-396). Students wishing to student-teach in a domestic or abroad site must meet with the coordinator to complete the required process.

    Elementary Education Major

    Students in the Elementary Education Program who are recommended for graduation from Gustavus and for an elementary school teaching license must complete the following:

    1. All college requirements for the B.A. degree.
    2. Two of the following: GEG-101, GEG-102, HIS-130, HIS-140, POL-110, or S/A-111.
    3. MCS-115 and MCS-140.
    4. One English course which focuses on composition and writing skill.
    5. One course in public discourse.
    6. PSY-100, MU S-107 and MU S-207, ART-248, HES-232, HES-315.
    7. EDU-268, EDU-210, EDU-230, EDU-241, EDU-246, EDU-247, EDU-320, EDU- 330, EDU-340, EDU-370, EDU-371, EDU-372, EDU-373, EDU-374, EDU-375, EDU-385, EDU-389, EDU-392, EDU-398, and EDU-399.
    8. Optional courses for completing a middle-level endorsement in one concentration area (Communication Arts/Literature, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies) or a major in a world language (see department handbook for specifics).
    9. Passing of the Minnesota Teacher Licensure Exam (MTLE ) Basic Skills Test as required by the Minnesota Board of Teaching.*
    10. Completion of the Standards of Effective Practice Portfolio.
    11. Completion of the Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA).*
    12. Passing scores on the Minnesota Teacher Licensure Exam (MLTE ) Tests as required by the Minnesota Board of Teaching.*

    Many of the program requirements noted above can also satisfy College general education requirements. Students need to consult with their major advisor each semester to verify that their course of study will meet Minnesota requirements for licensure.

    * Note: These requirements are for Minnesota state teaching license and not for graduation.

    Secondary Education

    A Bachelor of Arts degree with a Teaching major is required to complete the Secondary Education Program. Currently approved teaching majors are Art, Elementary and Secondary Education Biology, Chemistry, Communication Arts/Literature, Earth Science, Health, Mathematics, Music, Physical Education (Exercise Science), Physics, Social Studies, and World Language (Spanish). In the areas of Art, Music, Physical and Health Education, and Foreign Language, a Secondary Education Program student qualifies for licensure in grades K–12 by completing the appropriate program requirements. Please see each department’s section of the catalog for more information.

    Secondary Program Requirements:

    1. All college requirements for the B.A. degree.
    2. Completion of an approved teaching major.
    3. PSY-100 and HES-221.
    4. EDU-268, EDU-230, EDU-241, EDU-320, EDU-330, EDU-340, EDU-350, EDU- 351, EDU-368, EDU-389, EDU-398, Special Methods, EDU-394 or EDU-395, and EDU-399.
    5. Passing of the Minnesota Teacher Licensure Exam (MTLE ) Basic Skills Test as required by the Minnesota Board of Teaching.*
    6. Passing scores on the Minnesota Teacher Licensure Exam (MLTE ) Tests as required by the Minnesota Board of Teaching.*
    7. Completion of the Standards of Effective Practice Portfolio.
    8. Completion of the Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA).*

    Students need to consult with an advisor in the Education Department as well as the major advisor each semester to verify that their courses of study will meet Minnesota requirements for licensure.

    * Note: These requirements are for Minnesota state teaching license and not for graduation.

    Coaching

    Students in the Elementary and Secondary Education Programs may qualify for head coaching by completing the course requirements for a Coaching minor as outlined by the Department of Health and Exercise Science. Interested students should consult with Bonnie Reimann for additional information.

    Preparation for Graduate Study

    Gustavus graduates who qualify for teacher licensure in Minnesota are also eligible for graduate study in education. Teacher licensure and experience are usually required for graduate study in school administration, school counseling, and special education. Consult Education staff for particulars.

    Licensure

    Licensure to teach in the public schools of Minnesota will be recommended by the department and the Registrar at Gustavus to the Minnesota Board of Teaching upon completion of all program requirements. Elementary majors who complete the program successfully are recommended for a K–6 All Subjects license and a 5–8 Single Subject Endorsement, if the 5-8 requirements in a specific content area are completed. Secondary Education Program students who successfully complete the program are recommended for either a 5–12 license, a 9-12, or a K–12 license, depending on the specific subject area. In the event that a graduating student is not recommended for licensure, the student may appeal to an Academic Dean, who will ask for a written statement from both the student and the Gustavus Department of Education prior to rendering a decision. The Dean’s decision will be final. The student may appeal an institutional decision to the Minnesota Board of Teaching. (MN Statute 122A.09, Subdivision 4c).

    210 Children’s Literature (.5 course) This course is a survey of literature written for children. Attention is given to fiction and nonfiction picture books and chapter books (realistic fiction, informational books, biography, fantasy, poetry, multicultural literature, and other types), authors and illustrators, and themes of children’s literature. Students will critically examine children’s literature and examine reasons some children’s literature is challenged or censored. Fall and Spring semesters.

    230 Social Foundations of Education and Student Needs (1 course) This course offers an overview of the profession of teaching, with a focus on some or all of the following: social issues affecting schools and teachers, education in a multicultural society, the roles and the job of teachers, the history of education, the organization of elementary and secondary schools, the role of government in financing education, philosophies of education, and emerging trends and reforms in education. A field-based component of the course allows students to explore issues discussed in class in real-life situations in local educational institutions. Must be taken prior to enrollment in the education program. First Year or Sophomore status, or permission of instructor. SOSCI, Fall and Spring semesters.

    241 Educational Technology (.5 course) This course provides practical learning experiences addressing skills and understandings necessary for evaluating, selecting, accessing, and using educational media and instructional materials. It addresses the operation of various media, including computers, and guidelines for conventional use in the classroom and for educational presentations. Physical Education/Health majors may substitute HES-237. Fall and Spring semesters.

    246 Science for Elementary Educators I (1 course) This course is designed for future K-6 classroom teachers. The science content of the course will include in life science plants, trees, insects and in physical science energy, energy sources, energy transfer, force and motion. Application of the science content will be explored through regional natural history, threats to natural biomes and environments, and the dynamics of energy. Active learning of science will include investigations, experimentation, field work, and laboratory work. This course leads directly to the subsequent course, EDU 247; both should be completed before admission to teacher education. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. NASP, Fall semester.

    247 Science for Elementary Educators II (1 course) This course is designed for future K–6 classroom teachers. The science content of the course will focus on earth (geology, plate tectonics, hydrologic cycle, weather and climate) and space science (universe, stars, solar system), life science (reproduction, genetics, cell biology and heredity), and environmental science, developed within an interdisciplinary context where appropriate. Application of the science content will be explored through regional natural history, threats to natural biomes and environments, and the dynamics of energy. Active learning of science will include presentations, investigations, experimentation, field work, laboratory work, and field excursions. Field excursions are generally off campus with locations throughout Minnesota. This course builds directly from the preceding course, EDU-246. Both should be completed before admission to teacher education. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. NASP, Spring semester.

    248 Science Connections (.25 course) Required for elementary education science concentrations and science secondary teaching majors, this course facilitates science teachers making connections among various genres of science. Spring semester, even years.

    266 Clinical Experiences in Education (.5 course) A pre-student teaching experience. The student spends four to five hours per week working in an elementary or secondary school as a teacher assistant. A journal is required. The cooperating teacher submits an evaluation of the student’s participation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Fall and Spring semesters.

    268 Career Orientation to Teaching (1 course) This course provides an opportunity to assess interest in a teaching career by answering three questions: What is teaching? Who will I be teaching? How shall I prepare to teach? Students will examine personal cultural competence, analyze regional and national demographics, discuss current K-12 programming and trends, and assist/shadow a current classroom teacher. Small group work, journaling, and presentations on campus during the first half of January prepares the student for a focused field experience off Elementary and Secondary Education campus during the second half of the month. Two mandatory meetings in the fall are required. This course counts as one of a maximum of four internship credits allowed in the degree program. Interim Experience.

    320 Literacy for the K–12 Teacher (.75 course) This course is a study of the foundational principles of literacy acquisition in the Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12 setting. Observation and application of learning in elementary or secondary schools is required. This course must be taken concurrently with EDU-330 and EDU-340. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. Fall and Spring semesters.

    330 Developmental and Educational Psychology (1 course) A study of prenatal, child, and adolescent development and the principles of Psychology as they relate to teaching and learning. The course examines the principles and stages of human development prior to adulthood, as well as their educational implications. Emphasis is also placed on learning theory and design of instruction through identification of learning outcomes, effective teaching strategies, and assessment procedures. Normally taken in the junior year concurrently with EDU-320 and EDU-340. Prerequisites: PSY-100, EDU-268, and EDU-230, junior standing, and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Fall and Spring semesters.

    340 Middle School: Teaching Intermediate and Middle Level Learners (.5 course) This course will focus on the developmental approaches to teaching students who are transitioning from childhood into adolescence. Methodology and philosophical discussions of research related to development for middle school students, the impact of culture and socioeconomic status on learners, and appropriate ways to organize instruction, assessment and curriculum for student success at this age will be emphasized. A field experience will be included. This course must be taken concurrently with EDU-320 and EDU-330. Prerequisites: EDU 268, EDU 230, junior standing, and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Fall and Spring semesters.

    242, 342 Directed Experiences in Educational Research (Course value to be determined) In this course, students and the instructor will build competency in understanding the theoretical and practical basis of the research problem through studying selected educational literature, participating in critical discourse between the students and the instructor, and actively engaging in field research. Specific research methodologies and techniques will be created and/or explored under the guidance of the instructor. These methods will then be applied to a specific research problem. Prerequisite: permission of department. Offered on demand.

    350 Reading in the Content Area (.75 course) This course provides for the study of the Common Core English Language Arts Standards and the Minnesota Academic Standards in Language Arts for students in grades 7 through 12. The main emphasis is the teacher’s skill development in the application of literacy skills in the acquisition of content knowledge. This includes the examination and study of scientifically-based literacy strategies and methods appropriate for teaching and learning in the wide variety of courses offered in the secondary school. This course is taken concurrently with EDU-351 and EDU-368. Prerequisite: EDU-320, EDU-330, and EDU-340. Fall and Spring semesters.

    351 Methods and Materials of Secondary Education (.75 course) A study of the general instructional methods and planning practices for secondary educators. Students enhance their knowledge of pedagogy and develop an in-depth unit of study that incorporates Minnesota Content Standards. The course focuses on theory and research-based assessment, curriculum, and instructional models as well as positive classroom interactions, including ELL strategies. The course normally is taken in the semester immediately preceding student teaching and is taken concurrently with EDU-350 and EDU-368. Prerequisites: EDU-320, EDU-330, EDU-340, and admission to the Teacher Education Program. WRITD, Fall and Spring semesters.

    Special Methods of the Teaching Major (.25 course) A study of specific methods related to the major field of teaching taken prior to the professional semester and, if possible, in the semester immediately preceding the professional semester. Prerequisite: permission of the coordinator of the Education Program.

    • 354 Art Methods (Fall only)
    • 355 Chemistry Methods (Fall only)
    • 356 Earth Science Methods (Fall only)
    • 358 Biology Methods (Fall only)
    • MLC-357 Second-Language Teaching Methods (Fall only)
    • 359 Mathematics Methods (Fall only)
    • 360 Music Methods (Spring only)
    • 361 Physics Methods (Fall only)
    • 362 Social Studies Methods (Fall only)
    • 363 Communication Arts/Literature Methods (Fall only)

    368 Secondary Practicum (.25 course) Micro-teaching sessions and in-school placements provide opportunities for students to apply what they know as they teach peers and secondary students. All lessons are required to incorporate methodologies and models taught in the general methods course. Prerequisites: EDU-320, EDU-330, EDU-340, and admission to Teacher Education Program. Taken concurrently with EDU-350 and EDU-351. Fall and Spring semesters.

    370 Kindergarten Methods and Materials (1 course) A study of the historical, philosophical, sociological and psychological bases of the kindergarten as well as the materials and methods developmentally appropriate in a kindergarten program. Observation/participation in kindergarten classrooms is required. Taken concurrently with EDU-371, EDU-372, EDU-373, EDU-374, EDU-375, and EDU-385. Prerequisites: EDU-320, EDU-330, EDU-340, and admission to Teacher Education Program. Fall and Spring semesters.

    371 Elementary Science Methods and Materials (.5 course) A study of the methods and materials used in the teaching of science to elementary school children with emphasis on process and inquiry models and methodology. Observation/participation in the elementary schools is required. Taken concurrently with EDU-370, EDU-372, EDU-373, EDU-374, EDU-375, and EDU-385. Prerequisites: EDU-320, EDU-330, EDU-340, and admission to Teacher Education Program. Fall and Spring semesters.

    372 Elementary Language Arts Methods and Materials (.5 course) A study of the content, methods, and materials used in teaching the communicative arts in the elementary school. Emphasis is given to strategies and practices which promote proficient oral and written language throughout the elementary curriculum. Observation/participation in the elementary schools is required. Taken concurrently with EDU-370, EDU-371, EDU-373, EDU-374, EDU-375, EDU-385. Prerequisites: EDU-320, EDU-330, EDU-340, and admission to Teacher Education Program. WRITD, Fall and Spring semesters.

    373 Elementary Mathematics Methods and Materials (.5 course) A study of the basic concepts related to the teaching and learning of mathematics in elementary school. Students will explore and investigate math strands of the elementary curriculum, focusing on necessary procedural and conceptual understandings. Taken concurrently with EDU-370, EDU-371, EDU-372, EDU-374, EDU-375 and EDU-385. Prerequisites: EDU-320, EDU-330, EDU-340, and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Fall and Spring semesters.

    374 Elementary Social Studies Methods and Materials (.5 course) A study of the methods and materials used in the teaching of social studies to elementary school children with emphasis on integrated teaching and learning. Observation/participation in the elementary schools is required. Taken concurrently with EDU-370, EDU-371, EDU-372, EDU-373, EDU-375 and EDU-385. Prerequisites: EDU-320, EDU-330, EDU-340, and admission to Teacher Education Program. Fall and Spring semesters.

    375 Elementary Reading Methods and Materials (.5 course) A study of the methods and materials used in reading instruction. Observation and participation in the elementary schools is required. Taken concurrently with EDU-370, EDU-371, EDU-372, EDU-373, EDU-374 and EDU-385. Prerequisites: EDU-320, EDU-330, EDU-340, and admission to Teacher Education Program. Fall and Spring semesters.

    385 Elementary Interdisciplinary Models and Practicum (1 course) At the heart of this course is the application of interdisciplinary models and methods, application of multicultural Elementary and Secondary Education methodologies (including support of diverse learners in the general education classroom), and integration of content from all elementary methods courses within local elementary schools. Taken concurrently with EDU-370, EDU-371, EDU-372, EDU-373, EDU-374, EDU-375. Prerequisites: EDU-320, EDU-330, EDU-340, and admission to Teacher Education Program. Fall and Spring semesters.

    389 Methods and Materials in Inclusive Classrooms (.75 course) This course is designed for the pre-service teacher to study and apply skills necessary to meet the academic, physical and emotional development needs of the wide range of students who are present in the K-12 classroom. This includes students who are gifted and talented, learning disabled, emotionally impaired, physically handicapped, English language learners, children of poverty and students who require a 504 Plan. Emphasis is placed on the pre-service teacher applying learning strategies, accommodations and modifications that use specific methods, materials and technological advancements to meet the academic needs of the students. Prerequisites: admission to the Teacher Education Program and co-requisites: EDU-320, EDU-330 and EDU-340. Fall and Spring semesters.

    291, 391 Independent Study (.25–1 course) The study of educational topics through research and/or observation of school practices. Prerequisite: permission of the Department of Education. Fall and Spring semesters.

    392 K–6 Elementary Directed Teaching (3 courses) The course includes supervised participation and teaching in cooperating schools selected by the department. Seven weeks of full-time participation and teaching at each of two grade levels is required. The fourteen-week period is provided so that the student can become familiar with both the curricular and the co-curricular activities of the teacher. Prerequisite: admission to Professional Semester. Fall and Spring semesters.

    394 Secondary Directed Teaching (3 courses) Fourteen weeks of full-time supervised teaching at a cooperating school. The course provides a wide experience in the planning and directing of learning at a secondary school in the area(s) of the student’s teaching major(s). Prerequisite: admission to the Professional Semester. Fall and Spring semesters.

    395 K–12 Directed Teaching (3 courses) Fourteen weeks of full-time supervised teaching divided between the elementary and secondary school. This course provides a wide experience in the planning and directing of learning activities in art, music, health, physical education, or foreign languages and is designed for persons who seek licensure in grades K–12. Prerequisite: admission to the professional semester. Fall and Spring semesters.

    396 Middle Level Directed Teaching (1 course) Four weeks of full-time supervised teaching at a cooperating middle school/junior high. This course provides a broad experience in the planning and directing of learning for middle level learners in the area of the student’s endorsement. Interim Experience.

    398 Human Relations in Education (.5 course) This course examines theories and strategies for teaching in racially and culturally diverse classrooms. Topics include the experiences of diverse social and cultural groups in education; the impact of racism, sexism, and other forms of oppression on educational pedagogy and institutions; the influence of individual social identities on the teaching and learning experience; and strategies for teaching from a multicultural, antiracist perspective. Writing is an integral part of the course. Co-requisites: EDU-320, EDU-330 and EDU-340. Prerequisite: junior standing and admission to the Teacher Education Program. WRITD, Fall and Spring semesters.

    399 Seminar in Elementary/Secondary Curriculum and Instruction (.75 course) A capstone seminar in which analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and integration are stressed. Students are involved in a variety of practical projects and tasks before and during the directed teaching experience. Issues and trends in education are examined, along with rules and standards for teacher licensure and advice for getting that first teaching job. Requirements include the completion of the professional portfolio. Prerequisite: admission to the Professional Semester. WRITD, Fall and Spring semesters.