Russian (RUS)

Academic Catalog: 2013–2014

  • Denis Crnković

For a detailed description of the Russian and East European Studies major and minor, please see “Russian and East European Studies.”

Minor in Russian:RUS-251, RUS-253, and three other courses numbered above RUS-251.

The minor concentration in Russian Language and Literature familiarizes students with the language and literature of Russia and the cultural milieu that has produced some of the world’s greatest writers and thinkers. The minor offers a well-balanced series of advanced language, literature and culture courses designed to provide
a solid background for those wishing to enhance their study of Russian. Students minoring in Russian are strongly encouraged to participate in one of the College approved study away programs in Russia. Those who elect to study away, must plan their course of studies in careful consultation with their advisor. At least three of the courses presented for the minor must be taken at the College, and for those students who study abroad, at least one course in the minor must be completed at the College after returning from abroad. Any courses presented for transfer credit into the minor must be approved by the Department and the Russian faculty. In addition, the study abroad curriculum must be approved by the Russian faculty before departure.
Students majoring in Russian and East European Studies may not normally present more than one course above RUS-202 for both the REES major and the Russian minor.

101,102 Elementary Russian I, II (1 course, 1 course) The aim of these courses is to enable the student to read, write, comprehend, and speak Russian on an elementary level. Emphasis is placed on acquiring an understanding of the grammar and syntax of the language through conversation, writing, and language laboratory exercises. In addition, readings and texts introduce the student to daily life and culture in Russia. Offered annually.

201, 202 Intermediate Russian I, II (1 course, 1 course) These courses present a thorough and systematic study of advanced grammar with special emphasis on the more difficult aspects of the Russian language (verbal aspects, verbs of motion, prepositions). Students improve their reading, writing, and speaking skills through written reports, weekly language laboratory exercises, and discussion of essays on the ethnic, geographic, and cultural composition of Russia. In addition, one major work of Russian literature is read as a yearlong project. Prerequisite: RUS-102 and RUS-201, respectively. Offered annually.

221 19th Century Russian Literature (1 course) In English. This course introduces students to the major works and trends in Russian literature of the 19th century and examines the major literary philosophies and high culture of the era. The course highlights the masterpieces of the world-class Russian novel and short prose, as well as the classic works of the “Golden Age” of Russian poetry. Texts studied range from Pushkin’s lyric poetry and prose, to Lermontov’s Hero of Our Time, and the great works of Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Gogol, and Chekhov. LARS, offered bi-annually.

223 Russian Literature Since 1900 (1 course) In English. This course introduces students to the major works of Russian literature since 1900 and examines the major literary trends, philosophies and high culture of the Soviet and post-Soviet eras. Texts studied range from the lyric poetry of Russia’s “Silver Age” to the socialist realist novel, dissident and émigré literature of the Soviet era, and 20th century Russian satire. In addition, new directions and works in Russian post-modern literature since the fall of the Communist regime are studied. LARS, offered bi-annually.

244, 344 Special Topics in Russian (1 course, 1 course) Special topics in Russian studies. Content will vary. Courses will explore a topic or a problem in depth and students will read, discuss, and write. In RUS-244, readings, instruction, and discussion will be in English. In RUS-344, readings, instruction, and discussion will be in Russian. More than one special topic may be taken. Offered occasionally.

251 Conversation and Phonetics (1 course) This course is designed to improve the student’s conversational fluency in and comprehension of spoken, idiomatic Russian. Students develop speaking skills through daily conversation practice based on role-plays, oral presentations, and readings from contemporary newspaper, journal, and literary texts. In addition, comprehension is further improved and reinforced in weekly language laboratory assignments. Class conducted in Russian. Fall semester, odd years.

253 Composition (1 course) The major goal of this course is to improve the student’s abilities in writing Russian prose. Required daily theme papers and translations from English to Russian enable the student to gain fluency in writing various types of compositions including essays, personal correspondence, and more formal papers. In addition to daily themes, a longer essay is also required. Class conducted in Russian. Prerequisite: RUS-202, Fall semester, even years.

321 19th Century Russian Literature (1 course) This course introduces students to the major works and trends in Russian literature of the 19th century and examines the major literary philosophies and high culture of the era. The course highlights the masterpieces of the world-class Russian novel and short prose, as well as the classic works of the “Golden Age” of Russian poetry. Texts studied range from Pushkin’s lyric poetry and prose, to Lermontov’s A Hero of Our Time, and the great works of Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Gogol, and Chekhov. Major readings and lectures in English; additional assignments and weekly discussion in Russian. LARS, WRITD, offered bi-annually, concurrently with RUS-221

323 Russian Literature since 1900 (1 course) This course introduces students to the major works of Russian literature since 1900 and examines the major literary trends, philosophies, and high culture of the Soviet and post-Soviet eras. Texts studied range from the lyric poetry of Russia’s “Silver Age” to the socialist realist novel, dissident and émigré literature of the Soviet era, and 20th century Russian satire. In addition, new directions and works in Russian post-modern literature since the fall of the Communist regime are studied. Major readings and lectures in English; additional assignments and weekly discussion in Russian. LARS, WRITD, offered bi-annually, concurrently with RUS-223.

391 Independent Study (Course value to be determined) A scholarly project on some aspect of Russian language, literature, or culture, designed in coordination with the advising instructor and with permission of the department chairperson. See general guidelines on independent studies. Fall and Spring semesters.