NameSynonymShort TitleDescriptionMeeting DaysStart TimeEnd TimeFacultyArea ApprovalsComments
ART-116-00140242Bronze CastingThis course is centered around learning and technical aspects of bronze casting. Each student will be given several creative projects that will touch upon all of the bronze casting procedures used at the GAC foundry. Students must complete  a minimum of three major bronze castings, give an oral presentation and pass a written examination. All projects will be evaluated weekly in group critiques.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMShetkaIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $50.
Add'l. studio time will be required.
ART-210-00140243Media & InstallationENVIRONMENTS, MEMORY, AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA. This class is uniquely suited to the IEX term by allowing students with any major a specific period of time to collaboratively design and produce an art-work. The gallery scale artwork will examine as its subject matter the unique demographics of the Gustavus student body and the specific characteristic of their Midwest location. The course will challenge students to think about how this experience during J-Term can expand and grow their habits of mind, while also taking into account very physical or spatial obstacles that this term can produce: things like the weather, or the unique layout of the Shaefer Gallery or the individual dynamic and perspective of the students in the class. Students will have 4 weeks to allow themselves to focus on nothing else but experiential learning that is responding to the physical and mental environment they find themselves in during one unique IEX Term and they will create new artwork in response to that environment. M T W R F12:00PM02:00PMKassIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meets in Schaefer Gallery.
Course Fee: $75.
BIO-115-00140244Human MigrationEXPLORING HUMAN MIGRATION THROUGH THE LENSE OF PERSONAL HISTORY. How did our parents, grandparents, or great great grandparents brave the sea, air, and other natural barriers to leave the lands of their ancestors and make the arduous journey to come and start a new life in the United States? What are the diaspora communities and backgrounds of the more recent immigrants to Minnesota? Through scholarship, discussions, guest speakers, film, and field trips, we will explore first hand the questions posed above. Additionally, we will also examine case studies of the original populations of the diaspora communities that continue to inhabit the land of their ancestors. The goal of the course is for students to explore and appreciate their personal family histories and to gain an understanding of the broader historical, global, contemporary connections of human migration/immigration, enabling students to become informed, global citizens. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMGonsarIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $5.
BIO-131-00140269MN Aquatic StewardshipMINNESOTA AQUATIC LEADERSHIP. Do you enjoy fishing and the outdoors? Are you interested in biodiversity and ecosystem health? Come explore Minnesota's aquatic resources and become well-informed stewards of Minnesota's natural treasures. Classroom activities and lectures will examine such topics as aquatic insect and fish biology, lake and stream ecology, and management of aquatic resources in Minnesota. Students will develop a stewardship project, visit a fish hatchery, and have the opportunity to learn beginning fly-tying/casting techniques. A winter fly fishing day trip is planned. Grade assessment includes stewardship and creative stream ecology projects, student-lead debates, lab activities, lecture exam, case studies, readings, and class participation.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMEliasIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $60.
Add'l. lab time will be required.
BIO-150-00140315Conservatn in BoliviaBOLIVIA: CONSERVATION IN A CHANGING LAND. Far off the tourist trail, Bolivia is on the front lines of modern conservation challenges. Spanning from the tropical Amazonian forest to temperate highlands and the high Andes mountains, it is biologically and geographically one of the most diverse countries on earth. This course will engage you in many of the great political and conservation challenges faced by Bolivia and the world, including energy development, biodiversity conservation, access to water, and the many effects of climate change. We will start in the lowland city of Santa Cruz and the Isiboro Securé national park and indigenous territory and gradually go up in elevation to Cochabamba (site of the 2000 "water war"), the mining center of Oruro, Salar de Uyuni salt flat, Thunupa Volcano, and the melting glaciers in the highlands around Lake Titicaca above La Paz. From lowland flooding to highland drought, climate change and the tension between sustainable and exploitative development will shape our understanding of the conservation challenges in this changing land.   GrinnellIEXGrading: Student Option.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
CHE-120-00140245Chemistry in ProseCHEMISTRY IN PROSE--ELEMENTS OF MODERN LITERATURE. The natural world has inspired people of all fields for centuries, fueling scientific discovery, literature, and art. Three works of contemporary literature inspired by chemistry ("The Disappearing Spoon" by Sam Kean, "Stuff Matters" by Mark Miodownik, and "Uncle Tungsten" by the late Oliver Sacks) will be read, discussed and analyzed, from a chemistry and literary perspective, in addition to an exploration into aspects of science and the history of science that hold particular interest to individual students. Students will have the opportunity to create something from their own scientific inspiration through a medium of their choosing. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMHillIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
CHE-204-00140246Fermented Food ScienceWILD CULTURES: THE SCIENCE OF FERMENTED FOODS. Fermentations transform foods with simple flavor profiles into complex food products that have unique flavor profiles and potential health benefits. In this course, students will learn how to make their own starter cultures, how to ferment a variety of different foods and beverages and will learn about the science behind each fermentation. Moreover, students will learn how to isolate yeast and bacteria from their cultures. Additionally, field-trips to local companies that produce fermented foods and beverages will provide a different perspective on the process. M T W R F11:30AM02:30PMParejkoIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
CHE-215-00140346Chem Research MethodsRESEARCH METHODS IN CHEMISTRY.  An in depth research experience is often a critical motivating factor for students that ultimately choose a career path in the sciences. This course will provide students with opportunities to gain experience in developing and executing the synthesis of molecules as part of a medicinal chemistry project. Each student will gain experience with experimental design, multi-step synthesis, and structure determination. Students will also execute searches of the scientific literature, and present the results of their work both orally, and in writing..M T W R F09:00AM04:00PMBurIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Meets in NHS 305 at 9:00-9:30am.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Mtg. time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch breaks.
COM-107-00140247Presidential CommTHE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY: INAUGURATION 2017. This course offers students an opportunity to learn about the major political transition of the American political system, the inauguration of a new president. Students will participate in lectures, discussions, and will be expected to engage commemorative events (spend Friday, January 20th, watching the inauguration), reviewing the 2016 presidential campaign, the November election results, and the potential policy consequences of the change in executive and (potentially) legislative branch leadership. Students will be introduced to key aspects of current American politics, including its communicative (American Public Address), symbolic, social and policy aspects. Students will be required to be active participants in learning events, and complete analytical writing assignments and make presentations based on topics covered in the course.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMAndersonIEXGrading: Student Option.
COM-208-00140248Media Literacy 2.0MEDIA LITERACY 2.0: DIGITAL HUMANITIES AS A TOOL FOR MEDIA EDUCATION. Adolescence, first recognized as a cultural construct at the beginning of the 20th century, is a stage of life between childhood and adulthood characterized by pubertal change, identity formation, social development, and the acquisition of experiences and credentials promoting entry to adult roles. This course employs critical media theory to examine mediated images directed toward adolescent girls. Components of the course include an overview of representations of girls in the media, body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint, the influence of marketing moguls, and strategies for change. Coursework includes reading assignments, in-class discussion, writing assignments, and a final project incorporating digital humanities.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMWolterIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Priority given to FY and sophomore students.
COM-213-00140270Rhetoric of FoodTHE RHETORIC OF FOOD.  Food is a sensory experience. Its smell, taste, appearance, texture, and sound shape how we perceive it. In this sense, food communicates; it sends messages to which we respond as consumers. In this course, we will examine how food is presented and marketed and how that influences the way we think, eat, and spend money. We will explore the rhetorical nature of food by examining how, as consumers, we make decisions on what constitutes healthful and nutritious eating. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the digital realm shapes our perspectives on food. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMConnersIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Priority given to FY and sophomore students.
CUR-220-00140271Musical UnderstandingThis course provides students with an understanding and appreciation of the nature and place of music in contemporary culture. Music is a rich source of diversity of cultural influences as well as musical periods, styles, and media. The composer's perspective, the performer's role and the listener's responsibility provide points of departure for considering the individual's contributions to music and communal reaction to differing types of music or musical developments. Students will be involved in activities such as listening to recorded performances of music, attending performances of music on and off campus, writing papers for class presentations, discussing special topics, and participating directly in musical performance.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMKnoepfelIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Priority given to FY and sophomore students.
E/M-206-00140316Seattle Innovation"NEEDLE" IN A HAYSTACK--INNOVATION IN SEATTLE. This Interim course will combine course content with student-alumni engagement in the Seattle region. Championed in Seattle by Kari Petrasek '99, this course helps students learn innovative thinking skills within a variety of organizational contexts. This course also offers study-away January opportunities at an affordable price. Seattle's Gustie alumni group will open their companies' doors for students to learn what it takes to create a successful tech venture and how to be creative in any organization. We will also partner with the Gustie group to engage in service-learning, supporting Gustavus' core values. Coursework combines a Seattle area research paper, site visit analyses, site partner presentation(s), participation in course discussion activities, and reflection work.    Lund DeanIEXGrading: Student Option.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 3-6, Jan. 23-27, and Jan. 30
in BH 113.
E/M-250-00140249Financial TradingFINANCIAL TRADING: TECHNIQUES AND APPLICATIONS. This course introduces students to the technical analysis of financial trading. It will cover chart construction, trend and pattern recognition, market indicators, Moving Averages, Elliott Wave Theory, and cycle analysis. Students are expected to learn the concepts and tools and apply them in real-world situations using the online trading platform. Computational techniques will also be introduced to help students form strategies, build models, execute trades and manage risk. No prior knowledge in investment is required but students are expected to have a strong interest in the financial market and trading. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMSunIEXGrading: ABCDF.
E/M-278-00140273Fin Statement AnalysisFINANCIAL STATEMENTS ANALYSIS. Financial analysis is the selection, evaluation and interpretation of financial data and other pertinent information to assist in evaluating the operating performance and financial condition of the company. The objective of this course is to provide students with the theoretical and practical tools and methods to effectively navigate the complexity of financial and non-financial data, be able to draw inferences from past performance and to apply that information for future financial decision making. The course will combine both theoretical and practical applications of Financial Analysis. The course is designed to introduce Financial Statement Analysis topics tested on the CFA level I examination.M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMPietkaIEXGrading: ABCDF.
EDU-268-00140286Orientation to TeachingThis course is designed to help students assess their interests in teaching. The student spends one month working in an elementary or secondary school or other approved setting as a full-time teacher assistant. A journal, selected readings and on-line discussion provide opportunities for reflection during the experience in a school setting. Written assignments and attendance at a culminating retreat are required. Students attend an organizational meeting in the early fall to receive information regarding school placement options and course requirements. This course counts as one of a maximum of four internship credits allowed in the degree program.   VizenorIEX EXPGrading: Pass/Fail.
Course Fee: $30.
Permission Required.
EDU-396-00140347Middle Level Dir TchngMIDDLE LEVEL DIRECTED TEACHING. Four weeks of full-time supervised teaching at a cooperating middle school/junior high. This course provides a broad experience in the planning and directing of learning for middle level learners in the area of the student's endorsement.   PittonIEX EXPPermission required.
ENG-104-00140274Fairy TalesFAIRY TALES: CLASSIC & CONTEMPORARY. This course will focus on the classic fairy tales of western culture and their modern and contemporary recreations/adaptations. We will first read the original tales closely paired with criticism and commentary on these tales. We will then read or view contemporary versions of the original tale and compare and contrast the two. Students will also imagine and craft their own original fairy tale as well as research and present on a contemporary tale of their choosing.M T W R F11:00AM01:00PMRasmussenIEXGrading: ABCDF.
ENG-108-00140250Intro to ScreenwritingINTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING. This course focuses on writing for film and television. The class lays a foundation for the most basic element of filmmaking: storytelling. Students will learn the proper formatting for screenwriting, critically examine acclaimed screenplays, and work on their own writing in the correct screenwriting format, in addition to daily creative exercises.M T W R F12:00PM02:00PMCobbIEXGrading: ABCDF.
GEO-209-00140252BiodiversityBIODIVERSITY: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE. Have you wondered about why organisms live in different places? Are you curious about the distribution of life through time? How will it change in the future? Then this course about biodiversity is for you!! We will explore biodiversity through four projects that focus on modern biodiversity, the fossil record, how to record biodiversity, and the factors influencing the distribution of life. Included sub-topics and activities are local and global biodiversity, owl pellet dissection, biodiversity databases, processing ~350-million-year-old fossils, small mammal taxidermy, a field trip to museum collections, and projecting the future of biodiversity on Earth. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMElstad-HavelesIEXGrading: ABCDF.
GRE-100-00140275Anc Greek Lang & CultrANCIENT GREEK LANGUAGE AND CULTURE. This course is an introduction to ancient Greek and prepares students to jump straight into second semester Greek (GRE-102) and fulfill the College's language requirement. Taking this course will also improve students' understanding of how language works, enhance English vocabulary (including technical vocabularies such as scientific and medical terms), introduce them to Greek culture, and lay the groundwork for going on to read great works of literature, from Homer's poems through Plato to the New Testament. There will be daily homework and quizzes, a weekly test, and a final exam. Homework help will be offered in the afternoons by the instructor and Greek tutors, and there will be extracurricular opportunities to appreciate Greek culture and cuisine.M T W R F09:00AM11:30AMBruceIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
Language lab is available 1:00pm-4:00pm
on MTWR and 1:00pm-2:30pm on F in OM 205.
HES-102-00140287Begin TennisCourse objectives include developing basic tennis stroke skills, game skills, and gaining cognitive knowledge regarding tennis as a recreational lifetime activity.M W F08:30AM10:00AMCarlsonACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-105-00140289BadmintonThis course is designed to introduce and enhance the skills of the game, including strategies, scoring, and shots.M W F10:30AM12:00PMKleinschrodtACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
Permission required. Waiting list.
HES-116-00140290Weight TrainingStudents are introduced to skills, techniques, muscle physiology, and safety. After learning how to set up a personalo strength training program, students are better able to set goals to improve and maintain lifetime activity. Both free weights and machines are used.M W F08:30AM10:00AMKleinschrodtACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
Permission required. Waiting list.
HES-127-00140291Pilates ConditioningThis course will offer a mixture of Pilates, yoga and calisthenics training.M W F12:30PM02:00PMMoreACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-210-00140276Physical WellbeingEAT MOVE SLEEP--ENHANCE YOUR PHYSICAL WELLBEING.  Feeling tired, stressed, out of shape, or pulled in one too many directions? If you are like most people, establishing balance in one's life can be a real challenge. This course is designed for students interested in improving their physical wellbeing. Join us in the Department of Health & Exercise Science as we experientially navigate our way toward a personal understanding of improved nutrition, physical activity, and sleep patterns. Students will gain knowledge through lectures, outside readings and research, guest speakers, and the implementation of a campaign to promote wellbeing. Start your journey toward wellbeing this January!M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMTurleyIEXWaiting List. Permission Required.
Grading: ABCDF.
HES-225-00140277Allied Hlth OpportuntyOPPORTUNITIES IN ALLIED HEALTH.  Through course lectures, speakers, and research, students will gather information regarding allied health opportunities in fields such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistant, registered dietician, chiropractic and possible other fields. This course is designed for students with interest in allied health professions.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMVanDuserIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
HES-240-00140253Sport PsychologyUNDERSTANDING AND APPLYING SPORT PSYCHOLOGY.  This course is an indepth examination of the role of psychology in performance and enjoyment of competitive sport. Students in this class will examine topics including motivation, emotion regulation, anxiety, and self-perceptions in the context of competitive sport. This will involve completing sport and physical activity related labs and activities, attending games and/or practices, and interacting with professionals in the field of sport including coaches, athletes, sport psychologists, and researchers. Students will gain an understanding of how psychology predicts and explains sport performance and how modifying psychological variables can improve experience in sport. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMRussellIEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission Required--Waiting List.
HES-242-00140318OlympicQuest:ScandaviaSCANDINAVIAN OLYMPIC QUEST: UNDERSTANDING SPORT AND LEISURE IN SWEDEN, NORWAY, DENMARK, AND FINLAND.  Using a global, issues-oriented approach, participants will examine sports, leisure, the Olympic Games, and their relationship to society and culture in Scandinavia. By participating,  attending, and experientially reflecting on engagement within various cultural and societal  sites throughout Scandinavia, students will critically explore the links that exist between sport and leisure and the major spheres of social life.    BanksIEXGrading: Student Option.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
HES-243-00140319Eat Italy!EAT ITALY! FOOD, CULTURE, AND LIFESTYLE. This course is designed to provide experiences and understanding of the rich food culture and lifestyle practices of Southern Italy. Students will have an opportunity to cook regional and locally grown foods, reflect on food culture and traditions, and visit local farms. Particular emphasis will be placed on comparisons between the Southern Italy area and students' own food cultures, traditions, and practices. Course work will include readings, discussion, reflection, and a variety of writing opportunities.    OttoIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 3-10 in LUN 208.
HES-318-00140292Sr January AT ClinicalJanuary Senior Athletic Training Clinical Lab This course provides athletic training students the opportunity to participate in clinical education, discuss evidence based practice, and become trained in the Graston ® Technique.M T W R F  Joos Grading: ABCDF.
Athletic Training majors only.
HIS-146-00140320Brazil: InequalityINEQUALITY AND RESISTANCE: THE AFRO-BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE IN SALVADOR, BAHIA, BRAZIL. This course takes students for three weeks to coastal Salvador, Bahia, Brazil's fourth largest  city and its first colonial capital. Salvador played a key role in Brazil's historical and cultural formation. It is also one of the most important points of reference within the African Diaspora. Through coursework, workshops, tours, site visits to local NGO's, excursions, and  a service-learning project the course will explore the historical and contemporary constructions of race, class and gender inequality in Brazil. The course will also explore the ways that Afro-Brazilians have used culture and social movements to push back and rework inequality and structures of domination. Students will stay with host families and take basic Portuguese. Students will keep reflection journals, have readings, participate in class discussion, and write several short papers that relate the reading material, the themes of the course, and their experiences in Brazil.    IckesIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
HIS-217-00140278Digital HistoryHISTORY BYTES: HISTORY IN THE DIGITAL AGE. We live in a digital world filled with Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Wikipedia, and Wii. New technology is not just for entertainment, but can also prove useful for academics, creating new opportunities and new challenges for accessing and presenting research. As we embrace new technologies, will printed sources become artifacts of the past? Throughout this course we will discuss how technology influences the research and presentation of history. The course will culminate with the creation of group projects related to Gustavus history incorporating a technological component. Technological knowledge is not required, but may be beneficial.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMKrankingIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Priority given to FY and sophomore students.
IDS-212-00140254Korean DramaKOREAN DRAMA: TRANSNATIONAL CONTEXTS. This course explores the pop-cultural phenomenon of Korean Drama, or K-drama, and its global popularity and contexts. We will examine iconic Korean dramas (historical and contemporary dramas) and study their cultural following in East Asia and beyond. Students will use digital media, especially social media, to research the cultural dissemination and impact of K-drama on Asian geopolitics as well as on the flow of cultural capital between East Asian countries and the U.S. Students will also research online fandom, celebrity culture in East Asian media, and gender and media studies. Dramas will be screened in English translation.M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMParkIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Priority given to FY and sophomore students.
IDS-219-00140327Fantasy & Folklore UKFANTASY ON THE FRINGE: LITERATURE, FOLKLORE AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN THE UK. This course is designed for students interested in how the fantastic can provide a moral compass for the real. Fantasy and folklore provide an odd mirror of social reality, one that is at once distorting and hopeful. The quest to resist a great evil drives the narrative structure of much fantasy, which is why it appeals so powerfully to a deep-seated desire for social justice. In this course, we will consider examples of the fantastic in literature, folklore, art, museum exhibits, live theatre, significant folkloric sites, 'cabinets of curiosities' (and their successors), and UK pop culture (yes, even Harry Potter), while engaging with the cultural context of the UK through experiential learning. Students will synthesize their traditional and experiential learning through a series of short essays and three ethnographic engagement projects.  Students are expected to have the ability to think and write in a critical way.   AdkinsIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
IDS-220-00140345Sweden TodaySWEDEN TODAY SEMINAR: TRADITION AND CHANGE. This integrative course in the Semester in Sweden program assists students in shaping connections among and reflecting on the courses and on-site experiences offered in this semester program. Course content explores significant issues and events in contemporary Sweden through course materials, program activities, and personal encounters. A substantial amount of group discussion, writing, and public presentations are required, culminating in a final integrative project designed by the student with approval by the faculty leader. This course counts towards the Scandinavian Studies major.   WangIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Semester in Sweden Program.
JPN-145-00140321January in JapanJAPANESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE STUDY IN TOKYO.  In this course, students will engage in intensive language and cultural immersion at Hosei University, located in the center of Tokyo. Students with various levels of Japanese language proficiency-from beginning (with no previous experience) to advanced-may participate in this course; each student will be placed in an appropriate level class at the university. The course also offers opportunities to visit various sites of historical and cultural significance in Tokyo and its surrounding areas. In addition to the assignments and examinations (written and oral) in the Japanese language course, students will engage in reflection on their intercultural experience via group discussions and essays.    SakuragiIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
MCS-125-00140255Tilings/TessellationsTILINGS AND TESSELLATIONS: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MATHEMATICS AND MOSAIC ART. Whether simple or intricate, geometric patterns are intriguing to the eye. We will study how simple geometric tiles can fit together to cover large, or even infinite, two dimensional areas. From the Girih mosaics of Islamic art, to the tessellations of M.C. Escher, tilings of the plane have rich connetions to both mathematics and art. This course will focus on both fields, consructing tessellations both physically and mathematically. Students should be familiar with high school geometry.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMFordIEXGrading: Student Option.
Course Fee: $35.
Add'l. time for group work will be required.
MCS-232-00140256Algebraic StructuresALGEBRAIC STRUCTURES: COLLECT AND CLASSIFY. Problems of collecting, counting, and classifying are a recurring theme throughout mathematics, the arts, and sciences. A central idea uniting them all is symmetry. We will explore how the abstract algebra of symmetry groups is applied to diverse problems, from the classical to the modern. As we get to know the individual character of specific (and famous!) symmetry groups, and their place in the world, we will also begin to learn the epic story of how these groups themselves were ultimately classified in the twentieth century. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMSiehlerIEXGrading: Student Option.
MUS-109-00140257Music FundamentalsTHE FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSICAL THEORY. This is an intensive course addressing the basics of music theory and history. Focus will be on the fundamentals of Western theoretical practices including scales, key signatures, and chord progressions, with an introduction to voice-leading rules, four-part writing, and musical analysis. Aural skills, including sight-singing, melodic and harmonic dictations, and keyboard skills, will also incorporated. History will be addressed in the context and role of these concepts. M T W R F11:00AM01:30PMBryantIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Add'l. lab time will be required.
Lab meets 11:00am-3:00pm on Tues. in FAM 304.
MUS-154-00140258Contemp Vocal EnsembleCONTEMPORARY VOCAL ENSEMBLE. This course will study and perform contemporary vocal music. Open to all students by audition. Students will learn a wide variety of contemporary vocal literature during the January Interim. This ensemble will perform in area schools and other venues important for student recruitment and the overall advancement aims of the college. M T W R F10:30AM02:30PMDeanIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meeting time includes 1 hour lunch break.
MUS-156-00140311Gustavus ChoirA mixed-voice ensemble of approximately seventy members which studies and performs significant historical and contemporary choral repertoire. A concert tour is conducted each year, including an international tour every fourth year. Open by audition.M T W R F04:00PM06:00PMAune Grading: Student Option.
Friday rehearsal is at 4:30-6:30pm.
MUS-156-00240280Gustavus ChoirA mixed-voice ensemble of approximately seventy members which studies and performs significant historical and contemporary choral repertoire. A concert tour is conducted each year, including an international tour every fourth year. Open by audition.M T W R F04:00PM06:00PMAune Grading: Pass/Fail.
Friday rehearsal is at 4:30pm-6:30pm.
MUS-165-00140281Gustavus Wind OrchThe Gustavus Wind Orchestra is a course focused on the pursuit of music excellence, embodied by the aural study and performance of selected works from the great wind orchestra repertoire. GWO performances will be presented to several audiences in MN, WI, IA, and IL. Participation is mandatory at daily rehearsals and sectionals; enrollment is determined by audition. Except in an unusual circumstance, the course is limited to those persons who were enrolled in MUS 165 during the previous Fall Semester.M T W R F04:30PM06:30PMMiller Grading: ABCDF.
MUS-165-00240282Gustavus Wind OrchThe Gustavus Wind Orchestra is a course focused on the pursuit of music excellence, embodied by the aural study and performance of selected works from the great wind orchestra repertoire. GWO performances will be presented to several audiences in MN, WI, IA, and IL. Participation is mandatory at daily rehearsals and sectionals; enrollment is determined by audition. Except in an unusual circumstance, the course is limited to those persons who were enrolled in MUS 165 during the previous Fall Semester.M T W R F04:30PM06:30PMMiller Grading: Pass/Fail.
NDL-00-00140333UMAIE-Eastern Europe     IEXPermission required.
T4783
NDL-00-00240335UMAIE-Aust/Czech/Hung     IEXPermission required.
T4786
NDL-00-00340334UMAIE-Tanzania     IEXPermission required.
T4789
NDL-00-00440336UMAIE:Korea & Japan     IEXPermission required.
T4791
NDL-00-00540337UMAIE:Chile     IEXPermission required.
T4792
NDL-00-00640339UMAIE:New Zealand     IEXPermission required.
T4794
NDL-00-00740338UMAIE:England/France     IEXPermission required.
T4795
NDL-00-00840340UMAIE:France & Italy     IEXPermission required.
T40340
NDL-00-00940341UMAIE:Central Europe     IEXPermission required.
T4802
NDL-00-01040343UMAIE:United Kingdom     IEXPermission required.
T4805
NDL-068-00140304Career Explor PreregistrationThis is a required preregistration for those students who intend to pursue a career exploration during January but have not finalized their placement at the time of registration. Only preregistered students will be eligible for the final registration in a career exploration.    IEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Not open to First Year students.
NDL-100-00140283Film NoirTHE HISTORY AND ART OF FILM NOIR.  Film noir was a film movement that often emphasized moral ambiguity and sexual motivation. This course will trace the history of this movement from its literary and cinematic inception, its peak during the "classic period", to the neo-noir style of the modern era. In addition to the historical and artistic aspects of these films, the cultural implications of the movement will also be explored. This course is designed for people who love film. Course evaluation instruments include two exams, written work, and the group creation of a film noir short. Several books covering aspects of film noir history and analysis will be assigned.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMSaulnierIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Add'l time for film viewing is req'd on TR at
1:30-4:00pm in OHS 220.
NDL-104-00140284Army LeadershipFOUNDATIONS OF ARMY LEADERSHIP. There are many well-proven Army techniques for leadership, personal development, physical well-being, values, and ethics which can be used every day and which may be of interest to students, regardless of major. Others may be interested in this subject because of connections they have with friends or family in the military. This course is designed to introduce these ideas to those with little or no previous experience with the concepts of Army leadership and officership. In the classroom you will be exposed to the basics of the Army system and what it is like to be a U.S. Army officer. Students in the course will have required reading assignments and be expected to participate in classroom discussion and class activities. Every student will give an oral presentation, write a paper, keep daily logs, and take a weekly test.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMDartIEXGrading: ABCDF.
NDL-108-00140285Bouncing ForwardBOUNCING FORWARD: RESILIENCY SKILLS FOR THRIVING IN COLLEGE AND BEYOND. This course provides an introduction to the tools, concepts and principles of resilience offered by current research in the field of Positive Psychology and Mind-Body Medicine. This course is grounded in the Gustavus Wellbeing initiative, which identifies well-being as a choice to assume responsibility for the quality of one's life across multiple dimensions. We will be focusing on both the theory and practice of specific tools and strategies for increasing personal resilience and the overall well-being.M T W R F09:00AM10:00AMRusinkoIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Lab meets 10:30am-12:30pm on MTWRF in
FAC 219.
NDL-109-00140259Life TransitionsLIFE TRANSITIONS AND VOCATION.  This course will help you research, discover and discern your future life course. Throughout the four week class, you will identify your strengths, values, personal work preferences and vocation. We will study the world's most pressing needs and how your gifts and skills can address these needs. We will study the vocations of others by meeting people in the area and through readings. Finally, you will write your vocational story, create a resume, LinkedIn Profile, Handshake Profile and practice interviewing so that you can go out and tell your unique story to the world.M T W R F12:30PM03:30PMTunheimIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
NDL-110-00140260Game Show TheoryThis course will involve studying the historical evolution, winning tactics, host personalities, and exemplary players of famous game shows from the past 60 years. Students will learn and practice good techniques (when to play/when to pass, how much money to risk, etc.) designed to maximize winning chances, and will also have the chance to practice these techniques in a mock game show every week. We will study shows including but not limited to: Super Password, Deal or No Deal, Match Game, Let's Make a Deal, Wheel of Fortune, and we will also play a month-long game of Survivor.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMYoungIEXGrading: ABCDF.
NDL-113-00140293Building CommunitiesBUILDING COMMUNITY THROUGH CITIZEN DIPLOMACY. This is an alternative Interim course that explores different strategies in community building, with particular emphasis on Citizen Diplomacy, the Sister Cities Initiative and the Art of Hosting. In addition to class time where we will engage in dialogue based on assigned readings, videos and recorded reflections, students will commit to 10 weekly hours of community engagement in diverse fields such as ELL support, youth mentoring, K-2 reading support, math support, citizenship exam preparation, translation and interpretation, according to time availability and profile match.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMDwyerIEXGrading: ABCDF.
NDL-116-00140294Analyzing JapanUnderstanding another culture is a cumulative yet never-ending process, and especially if you are fascinated by or feel threatened by Japan, this course may be for you. For one month we will immerse ourselves in "things Japanese," as we explore the foundations of Japanese culture through an analysis of almost everything from history to sumo wrestling. Japanese language ability is not a prerequisite, although we will use a limited number of Japanese terms throughout the course to introduce cultural concepts.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMLeitchIEXGrading: Student Option.
Course Fee: $20.
NDL-202-00140295Geochem Resrch MthdsRESEARCH METHODS IN GEOCHEMISTRY. A research experience is often a pivotal experience triggering students to choose a scientific career path. This course will give students experience in geochemical research methods and will focus on the transport of metals in northern Minnesota peatland watersheds. The class will travel to the Marcell Experimental Forest in northern Minnesota to collect soil cores and to meet with US Forest Service scientists and staff. In the lab, students will measure mercury and other trace metals and characterize properties of the soil using modern instrumentation. Students will do literature searches and present their findings orally and in writing.M T W R F09:00AM03:30PMJeremiasonIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Permission Required.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break and
lunch break.
NDL-243-00140296ForensicsThis course focuses on the study and practice of intercollegiate speech and debate. Students will be expected to participate in public speaking events including persuasive speaking, informative speaking, impromptu and extemporaneous speaking, oral interpretation of literature, and public forum debate. In addition to regularly attending tournaments at the discretion of the Director of Forensics, students also be expected to participate in on-campus speech and debate activities and to participate in a content analysis study of intercollegiate forensics ballots. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMVoightIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
NDL-310-00140297Genealogy ResearchGENEALOGY: RESEARCH & EXPLORATION. It has been said that all history is local. With that in mind, one's family history is their most immediate connection to the past. Students completing this course will have gained a fuller understanding of their complex family histories; explored a variety of genealogy resources; used software applications; become acquainted with archival repositories, libraries, cemeteries, government offices, and relevant websites. Students are expected to conduct research, develop digital mediums, compile findings in written narrative and chart form, and present their stories in class. A laptop computer is required.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMJensonIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Priority given to FY and sophomore students.
NDL-350-00140324One Voice in TanzaniaWITH ONE VOICE IN TANZANIA.  This course is designed for students who are interested in exploring health in Tanzania from a holistic perspective that regards one's physical, emotional, and spiritual wellbeing as intricately enmeshed. Students will interact directly with people in rural and urban health care settings, as well as spend time being part of a rural village's daily life. Because music plays an important role in Tanzanian culture, students will have numerous opportunities to join the people of Tanzania in singing favorite Tanzanian songs of faith in Swahili. Students will write daily narratives that reflect on the meaning of this experience. Using VanManen's phenomenological approach, students will explore the lived experience of physical, emotional, and spiritual wellbeing amongst Tanzanians.    ZustIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
PCS-220-00140261PostConflict Lit/FilmPOST-CONFLICT IN LITERATURE AND FILM. In this course students will explore and critically engage with how societies create specific measures to move beyond armed conflict and create more harmonious relationships; and with the way in which literature and film either critique or propose such measures. We will analyze and reflect on both ancient (Sophocles' "Ajax" and other classical materials) and modern sources (films such as "Waltz with Bashir", "Oedipus, mayor", "Photographs on a Sea of Lies", "The Secret in their Eyes" (Argentine version), "Death and the Maiden", and modern literary works) to reflect on current trends of post-conflict and transitional justice: the importance of truth and memory, justice, and reparation with guarantees of no-repetition for the victims. Students will also create their own way to illuminate the issue through a digital project. M T W R F09:00AM11:30AMMejia SuarezIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
Lab meets 1:00pm - 2:00pm on some days.
Priority given to FY and sophomore students.
PHI-215-00140262Women/Myths/MatriarchsWITCHY WOMEN: WOMEN, MYTH, AND MATRIARCHAL CULTURE. Oracle, sorceress, demon-worshipper, and hag: all have been terms used to describe certain kinds of women, better known as simply "witches." But who is the "witchy woman," and why is she so witchy? This course will look at the cultural shifts and myths that mark transformations in the way of thinking about women: women as matriarchal leaders, and women as witches. Students will study various approaches to time, ritual, myth, symbols, and the philosophy of culture, and investigate the conceptual relations between women, the body, and the earth. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMMuellerIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
PHY-210-00140299Scientific ProgrammingSCIENTIFIC PROGRAMMING FOR THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES. This course will provide an introduction to the C and Matlab computer languages and to their application to problems in physics, engineering, applied mathematics and simulations of systems. C, or common relatives such as Java and C++, continues to be one of the most commonly used computer languages. In recent years, a growing number of users in science and engineering have been using Matlab as a programming language. There will be required textbook readings, homework assignments, in-class exams, and a final project, in which students will be encouraged to develop software in an area of interest.M T W R F09:00AM12:00PMHuberIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
POL-107-00140300Hollywood & PoliticsU.S. POLITICS, THE VIEW FROM HOLLYWOOD. Politics has always been a major theme for the American film industry. Controversies over the historical accuracy and political intent of films such as JFK and Malcolm X demonstrate that movies have the capacity to influence public attitudes towards specific figures and the political culture itself. This course will analyze several films, deliberately spanning the time period from the Great Depression to the present, to see what they tell us about the political culture of their time, and what messages (if any) they have for contemporary politics. Students will watch and discuss approximately 15 films, and will complete two exams and two papers (topics to be determined).M T W R F12:30PM03:30PMGilbertIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
POL-111-00140325Inauguration: Wash DCINAUGURATION POLITICS: WASHINGTON, D.C.. Presidential inaugurations are a tradition that draws attention to the important role played by our national governing institutions. Using a framework of civic engagement, this course examines formal institutions of American government (Congress, the Presidency, the federal bureaucracy, and the courts) and nongovernmental institutions, such as the media, political parties, and interest groups, all of which work to shape public policy and current political debates. Our class begins on campus with  lectures, discussions, and debates related to political participation and current events. The second half of the course involves travel to Washington, D.C., featuring visits to governmental and nongovernmental institutions, meetings with individuals in a variety of political careers, and attendance at the 2017 presidential inauguration. The trip includes visits to several museums and monuments in Washington, D.C. Pre-requisite: POL-110 is recommended.    KnutsonIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 3-13 at 9:00-11:30am in
OM 205. Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
PSY-120-00140263Psych Heroes/VilliansPSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF HEROES AND VILLAINS. Why is Batman so angsty? Why are Jon Snow and Ramsay Snow complete opposites? Was Dexter really only a killer because of his past? This course will use developmental psychology to explain behaviors of heroes and villians in popular culture (including comic books, TV shows, and films). Academic readings will cover concepts from developmental psychology as predictors of disordered thinking and behaviors. Comic book issues, television episodes, and films will be assigned to illustrate how the readings apply to the characters. Classes will be primarily discussion-based and will focus on tying academic readings to characters' origin stories.M T W R F11:00AM02:00PMSaczawaIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required--Waiting List.
PSY-209-00140264Psych of Video GamesTHE PSYCHOLOGY OF VIDEO GAMES. Video games are everywhere. Many games are excellent educational tools, and some games confer cognitive and mental health benefits. At the same time, congressional hearings debate the dangers of video game violence, and the DSM-5 lists "Internet Gaming Disorder" as a condition for further study. This course will draw on cross-disciplinary research to explore the psychological underpinnings of video games. By reading scientific and anecdotal reports about games and gamer culture, and by researching and engaging with a game of your choice throughout the term, you will discover how games serve as a cultural artifact, social space, and platform for learning. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMReederIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Add'l. lab time will be required.
PSY-242-00140301Forensic PsychologyThis course will examine the application of psychology to the criminal and civil justice systems, with specific focus on relevant aspects of social and clinical psychology. We will learn about various approaches to the psychological study of the law, psychologists' roles within the criminal and civil legal system, moral dilemmas within the law, police psychology, eyewitness testimony, expert witness testimony, evaluation of criminal suspects, competency to stand trial, insanity pleas, jury selection and decision making, civil commitment, sentencing, and prison psychology. As a result of self-direction and personal interest, students will gain an understanding of subspecialty areas through individual projects.M T W R01:30PM04:00PMLloydIEXGrading: ABCDF.
REL-102-00140265Ancient WritingCUNEIFORM, HIEROGLYPHS, AND ALPHABETS: HOW ANCIENT PEOPLE WROTE. This course will explore some of the earliest known writings and writing systems on the planet, especially those from the ancient Near East and Mediterranean. We will write cuneiform on clay, paint hieroglyphic signs, learn Hebrew and Greek alphabets, and invent our own systems of writing. We will also read about the masterminds who deciphered ancient writing systems, and learn about systems that remain mysteries to this day. Do you like codes or word games, art, ancient history, linguistics, ancient religions, Bible studies, foreign languages, or detective stories? This course will touch on all these topics and more. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMBroidaIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Add'l. lab time will be required.
Meets occasionally in FAA 205.
REL-162-00140330Chr Ethics: AffluenzaRELIGIOUS ETHICS AND THE CHALLENGE OF AFFLUENZA. America is a society that consumes more than its share of the world's resources; but how much is too much? How does our robust consumerism affect our neighbors? How does it affect the environment? How does it affect our relationship with God and with ourselves? We will explore these questions and others, bringing religious resources to bear. Topics include, virtue theory, religious objections to usary, the environmental and economic impact of "Affluenza," and the presence of contemporary communities devoted to living a life of "voluntary simplicity." Students are expected to journal, prepare group projects, presentations and a paper, and to enthusiastically participate in class discussions.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMGaeblerIEXGrading: Student Option.
REL-225-00140326Vocation in GermanyFAITH, LOVE, AND MUSIC IN GERMANY: EXPLORING VOCATION IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF LUTHER, BACH, AND BONHOEFFER. What am I called to do with my life? What are my passions? What are my greatest gifts and talents? How can I use them to contribute to the common good? How do I balance responsibilities to my family, profession, and community? Such questions are related to a Lutheran understanding of vocation or calling. This course gives students an opportunity to explore the notion of vocation by examining the lives of three influential Lutherans in Germany: Martin Luther (16th Century), Johann Sebastian Bach (18th Century), and Dietrich Bonhoeffer (20th Century). Since all three figures deeply appreciated the power of music, the course also explores their ideas about music, Luther's hymns, and Bach's compositions. The course includes visiting important sites in the lives of these figures (such as Berlin, Wittenberg, Leipzig, Erfurt, Weimar, Buchenwald concentration camp, Eisenach, and Heidelberg); touring important museums and churches connected with these figures; hearing the Thomaner Chor  at the Thomaskirche, Bach's central church in Leipzig; and attending concerts, including by  Leipzig's famous Gewandhaus Orchestra. Students will read and discuss primary texts regarding each thinker's views of faith and love of neighbor; explore ways in which they discerned and articulated their sense of calling or vocation; and have opportunities to reflect on their own sense of vocation. Participants will stay overnight in Berlin, Wittenberg (where Luther posted the "95 Theses"), Leipzig (where Bach worked), Weimar, Erfurt (in the monastery where Luther was a monk), and Heidelberg.  Throughout the course students will learn about German history, culture, the situation of the church in former East Germany, and current challenges facing church and society in unified Germany. This course is open to all students and especially attractive to those interested in theology, religion, ethics, Germany, history, and/or music.    BungeIEXGrading: Student Option.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
S/A-105-00140268Soc of Harry PotterHARRY POTTER AND THE SOCIOLOGIST'S STONE. J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series is a worldwide phenomenon that has sold more than 450 million books and been translated into dozens of languages. Come take a sociological look at the rich society Rowling has created. Students will be introduced to fundamental concepts of sociology using the lens of the Harry Potter series. We will explore questions of hierarchy, inequality, stereotypes, race, class, and gender. Students will explore the ways that stratification in the wizarding world compares and contrasts to similar issues in the Muggle world. Class discussions and exercises will assume students have read all seven Harry Potter books.M T W R F11:30AM02:00PMJennerIEXGrading: ABCDF.
SCA-205-00140329AIDS in Sweden & U.S.AIDS CRISIS IN SWEDEN AND THE UNITED STATES. This course examines Tony Kushner's Angels in America in conversation with Swedish author Jonas Gardell's trilogy 'Never Dry Tears Without Gloves' and allows students to engage in an in-depth textual and discourse analysis in order to examine the broader historical, political and sociological realities of the AIDS crisis both in the U.S. and Sweden. This course will employ a number of interdisciplinary frameworks, including queer theory trauma theory, in order to engage these works as an interrogation of the political and cultural histories and realities in the U.S. and Sweden during the AIDS crisis in the 1980s and 1990s.M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMWarburtonIEXGrading: ABCDF.
T/D-107-00140303January ProductionJANUARY PLAY PRODUCTION. This course is an intensive four-week production workshop culminating in performances early in February. The work is selected annually and is part of the production season of the Theatre and Dance Department. In alternate years, a musical is produced in conjunction with the Department of Music. The daily schedule may include some combination of acting, singing, dance or instrumental rehearsals as well as scenery and costume construction. Performers and musicians may also be assigned to production crews. There will be opportunities to discuss the work as it progresses with the directors and designers to gain insight into the theatrical process. Students wishing to perform must audition in late October or early November. Limited spaces are availabe for students interested only in working on technical crews, and they must interview with the Technical Director in October or November and register for T/D-211, 212, or 213. Performers and musicians must be available for rehearsals and performances in February.M T W R F11:30AM09:30PMMacCarthyIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Permission Required.
Does not meet at 2:30-4:30pm on Fridays.
Meeting time includes lunch & dinner breaks.
Also meets in Anderson Theatre.
T/D-114-00140314Dance Rep IntensiveDANCE REPERTORY INTENSIVE. This course will provide the opportunity for serious dance students to work intensively with guest teachers Jordan Klitzke, Melissa Herrada, Anthony Roberts and theatre and dance faculty Sarah Hauss and Jill Patterson. Students will take a two-hour technique class taught by one of these outstanding dance educators which will be followed by opportunities to participate in the creation and/or reconstruction of three dances. Casting for these works was done in September and students need permission to register. M T W R F10:30AM08:30PMPattersonIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Does not meet at 2:30-4:30pm on Fridays.
Meeting time includes 1 hour lunch break
and 2 hour dinner break.
T/D-115-00140305Asstnt Stage MngrThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM02:30PMWilkensIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Mtg. time includes lunch break.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00-10:00pm in
Anderson Theatre.
T/D-119-00140307Asst Directing PractThis course provides students with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F11:30AM09:30PMMacCarthyIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Permission Required.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Meeting time includes lunch & dinner breaks.
T/D-215-00140306Stage ManagementThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM02:30PMWilkensIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Mtg. time includes lunch break.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00-10:00pm in
Anderson Theatre.
T/D-219-00140310Asst Directing PractThis course provides students with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F11:30AM09:30PMMacCarthyIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Permission Required.
Does not meet at 2:30-4:30pm on Fridays.
Meeting time includes lunch & dinner breaks.
T/D-237-00140313Costume ConstructionHANDS-ON COSTUME CONSTRUCTION. Do you love Project Runway? Would you like to learn how to make clothes that appear on stage? Then this class is for you! We will be building the costumes for the January production. No previous theatre or sewing experience necessary. You will learn to machine and hand sew, and then we will build garments from scratch and alter existing garments which will be worn in the actual production. Assignments vary but can include costume building and alterations, crafts, hat making (millinery), and jewelry making. But it's so many hours! Most of your homework will be done in class. M T W R F10:30AM01:30PMMcConnellIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
T/D-272-00140308Interm Creative ExpINTERMEDIATE CREATIVE EXPRESSION. This course provides a mentored opportunity to gain hands-on experience in a particular focus area of theatre arts. Working with a faculty advisor, students will undertake a specific project integral to the production of the January Interim theatre production. Students will be integrally involved at every level of production, and will have a specific responsibility/role in the design, directing, or performance process.M T W R F11:30AM09:30PMMacCarthyIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Permission Required.
Does not meet at 2:30-4:30pm on Fridays.
Meeting time includes lunch & dinner breaks.
T/D-372-00140309Adv Creative ExpADVANCED CREATIVE EXPERIENCE.  This course provides an opportunity for individual coaching/mentoring in theatrical design and technology, acting, or directing. While structured according to the skill levels of individual students, the course is intended to provide advanced students with a master class for preparation of materials for application to graduate school or professional work.M T W R F11:30AM09:30PMMacCarthyIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Permission Required.
Does not meet at 2:30-4:30pm on Fridays.
Meeting time includes lunch & dinner breaks.