NameSynonymShort TitleDescriptionMeeting DaysStart TimeEnd TimeFacultyArea ApprovalsComments
ART-107-00135149Web Design WorkshopThis course gives students the basic visual and technical skills for creating engaging websites. Students will take part in class exercises that will serve as the basis from which a larger website project will stem from. Effective use of color, imagery, and elements of design as well as issues of interactivity will all be addressed in this course. Software used will offer students an understanding of how different approaches to web development affect both the creation and display of content.M F11:00AM02:00PMLukeIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Also meets 8:00 - 9:50am on TWR in BH 112.
BIO-109-00135175TaxidermyTAXIDERMY: THE ART AND SCIENCE OF RESURRECTION. A bird hits the window of a building. A hunter kills a deer. Can we give the animal back its life? Clearly not, but we can give it the semblance of life and can learn about the animal in the process. Since the first naturalists collected animals for study, the preservation of skins, bones, and bodies has been a necessary art. This class will look at the techniques used by museum preparators and professional taxidermists, and will apply some of them as we work in the lab to prepare bird and mammal study skins and live mounts. M T W R F10:30AM03:30PMGrinnellIEXGrading: Student Option.
Course Fee: $20.
Meeting time includes 1 hour lunch break.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
BIO-112-00135176Science in the MediaSCIENCE IN THE MEDIA: WHO'S THE AUTHORITY? Is climate change caused by an increase in greenhouse gases? Is there a link between vaccination and autism? Should we be eating like cavemen? These are topics that will be investigated in this class. There is a lot of scientific data that has been generated related to these topics. What does this data indicate? What other messages are we getting about these topics from the popular media and high-profile individuals? In this class we will use research, discussion, debate, and other media platforms to delve into the portrayal of science in the media.  M T W R F09:00AM11:30AMVriezeIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
BIO-131-00135151MN Aquatic StewardshipMINNESOTA AQUATIC LEADERSHIP. Do you enjoy fishing and the outdoors? Are you interested in biodiversity and ecosystem health? Come explore Minnesota's aquatic resources and become well-informed stewards of Minnesota's natural treasures. Classroom activities and lectures will examine such topics as aquatic insect and fish biology, lake and stream ecology, and management of aquatic resources in Minnesota. Students will develop a stewardship project, visit a fish hatchery, and have the opportunity to learn beginning fly-tying/casting techniques. A winter fly fishing day trip is planned. Grade assessment includes stewardship and creative stream ecology projects, student-lead debates, lab activities, lecture exam, case studies, readings, and class participation.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMEliasIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $60.
Lab meets 8:00am - 4:30pm in NHS 324.
CHE-215-00135221Chem Research MethodsRESEARCH METHODS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. An in depth research experience is often a critical motivating factor for students that ultimately choose a career path in the sciences. This course will provide students with opportunities to gain experience in developing and executing the synthesis of molecules as part of a medicinal chemistry project. Each student will gain experience with experimental design, multi-step synthesis, and structure determination. Students will also execute searches of the scientific literature, and present the results of their work both orally, and in writing.M T W R F09:30AM04:00PMBurIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch breaks.
Also meets 9:00 - 9:30am on MTWRF in NHS 305.
CHN-111-00135177Chinese CultureINSIGHTS INTO CHINESE CULTURE. This course will examine the ancient world of China from its earliest beginnings through late feudal China. It will introduce traditional ways of thinking that ancient Chinese perceive themselves and their environment. By reading the English text of Chinese philosophies (Confucianism, Taoism, etc.), ancient China's imperial power development, foreign trade between ancient China and other countries, development of China's spoken and written language, students will enrich their understanding of both Chinese cultural values and their own cultural identity. Through comparisons between students' heritage cultures and traditional Chinese values, we will attempt to answer questions as: How are cultures reflected from a country's artifacts and architecture? Why is feudal China able to maintain its unity during the long history of over 2000 years? What role do religions shape ancient Chinese people's outlook on nature and life? The class is a mixture of lectures, group discussions, watching film documentaries, a field trip to a museum in Minneapolis, and many other hands-on experiences. At the end of the class, the instructor will introduce a unique aspect of China's food culture to students with an authentic taste of China!M T W R F01:30PM03:30PMLiIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meets 12:30 - 2:30pm on Fridays.
COM-113-00135152Social Impact of MediaTHE SOCIAL IMPACT OF MEDIA ON ADOLESCENT GIRLS. Adolescence, first recognized as a cultural construct at the beginning of the 20th century, is a stage of life between childhood and adulthood characterized by pubertal change, identity formation, social development, and the acquisition of experiences and credentials promoting entry to adult roles. This course employs critical media theory to examine mediated images directed toward adolescent girls ages 9-17. Major components of the course include an overview of representations of girls in the media, body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint, the influence of marketing moguls, and strategies for change. Coursework includes reading assignments, in-class discussion, and writing assignments.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMWolterIEXGrading: ABCDF.
COM-206-00135214Fiji/New Zealand CultrTROUBLE IN PARADISE: NEGOTIATING POSTCOLONIAL CULTURE IN FIJI & NEW ZEALAND. Despite similar origins, indigenous peoples in Fiji and New Zealand have rich and diverse cultural histories that were shaped by their experiences in their respective environments and the different forms of colonization they endured. By examining media, performance (dance and music), nonprofit organizations, and governmental policies, this course explores the cultural identity of indigenous Fijians and the Maori of New Zealand, including issues of race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation. Students will explore these issues through guided journals, class discussion, a research paper, and a group presentation.   LangIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
COM-213-00135172Food as CommunicationFood is a sensory experience. It's smell, taste, appearance, texture, and sound shapes how we perceive it. In this sense, food communicates; it sends messages to which we respond as consumers.  In this course, we will examine how food is presented and marketed and how that influences the way we think, eat, and spend money. We will explore the rhetorical nature of food by experiencing it, reading about it, and discussing it. We will visit sites where food is distributed (like farmers' markets and grocery stores) and talk about marketing challenges and opportunities. Course assignments will include papers, presentations, and interviews. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMConnersIEXGrading: ABCDF.
CUR-220-00135223Musical UnderstandingThis course provides students with an understanding and appreciation of the nature and place of music in contemporary culture. Music is a rich source of diversity of cultural influences as well as musical periods, styles, and media. The composer's perspective, the performer's role and the listener's responsibility provide points of departure for considering the individual's contributions to music and communal reaction to differing types of music or musical developments. Students will be involved in activities such as listening to recorded performances of music, attending performances of music on and off campus, writing papers for class presentations, discussing special topics, and participating directly in musical performance.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMKnoepfelIEXGrading: ABCDF.
E/M-104-00135153Personal FinanceThis course is designed to help students understand the impact of personal financial decisions. Topics covered will include financial management, spending and credit, buying a home and auto, understanding insurance (health, auto, home, life), saving and investing, retirement and estate planning, and personal income taxes. Students will compile personal financial statements and budgets; demonstrate knowledge of finance, debt, and credit management; and evaluate and understand insurance and taxes. This course will provide a foundational understanding for making informed personal financial decisions.M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMJirikIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Lab meets 2:30 - 3:20pm on MTWR in BH 303.
EDU-268-00135213Orientation to TeachingThis course is designed to help students assess their interests in teaching. The student spends one month working in an elementary or secondary school or other approved setting as a full-time teacher assistant. A journal, selected readings and on-line discussion provide opportunities for reflection during the experience in a school setting. Written assignments and attendance at a culminating retreat are required. Students attend an organizational meeting in the early fall to receive information regarding school placement options and course requirements. This course counts as one of a maximum of four internship credits allowed in the degree program.   VizenorIEX EXPGrading: Pass/Fail.
Permission Required.
ENG-103-00135154World of Tim BurtonThis course explores the bizarre and fascinating world of Tim Burton's films. This is a world comprised of unusual stories and striking images, some originals while others re-creations. Through original storytelling and visual representation, Burton realizes unforgettable characters and scenarios (Edward Scissorhands, The Corpse Bride); in adapting known texts, he uses his signature style to make them new again (Sweeney Todd, Alice in Wonderland). As he is one of the few filmmakers who are both commercially successful and critically acclaimed, we will both enjoy and study Burton's creations and the works that inform them. Assignments will include reading, viewing, research, writing, and creative project.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMLeeIEXGrading: ABCDF.
ENG-104-00135155Fairy TalesFAIRY TALES: CLASSIC & CONTEMPORARY. This course will focus on the classic fairy tales of western culture and their modern and contemporary recreations/adaptations. We will first read the original tales closely paired with criticism and commentary on these tales. We will then read or view contemporary versions of the original tale and compare and contrast the two. Students will also imagine and craft their own original fairy tale as well as research and present on a contemporary tale of their choosing.M T W R F11:00AM02:00PMRasmussenIEXGrading: ABCDF.
ENG-109-00135156Utopian YA Lit/FilmUTOPIAN YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE & FILM. Utopias practice the principle of hope, transforming hope into a blueprint for a possible future of dreams and fears. What elements of utopian literature are uniquely suited to Young Adult literature? What might explain the popularity of Young Adult utopian novels? Beginning with the text that put the word on the map, Utopia, we will consider how this text informs The Giver and The City of Ember. In addition, we will view films such as Wall-E or Star Trek. Students will shape the class by introducing utopias and constructing a blog to contribute to the academic conversation about utopian literature.M T R10:30AM12:30PMMooreIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Also meets 11:30am - 2:30pm on Wed. and
10:30am - 12:30pm on Fri.
ENG-110-00135157Dystopian YA Lit/FilmDYSTOPIAN YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE & FILM. Dystopias hold a mirror to societies' flaws; this class asks what those flaws are, and why they target a young adult audience. What elements of dystopian literature are suited to Young Adult literature? What might explain the popularity of Young Adult dystopian novels? Beginning with the iconic classics 1984, Brave New World, we will consider how these texts inform The Hunger Games and Divergent. In addition, we will view such films as The Matrix or Aeon Flux. Students will have the opportunity to shape the class by introducing dystopias and constructing a blog to contribute to the academic conversation about dystopian literature.M T R01:00PM03:00PMMooreIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Also meets 11:30am - 2:30pm on Wed. and
1:00pm - 2:30pm on Fri.
ENG-210-00135173Marriage/Money/MoralsMARRIAGE, MONEY, AND MORALS THEN AND NOW. Whom should I marry? What should I do with my life? What should I do in this sticky situation and why do we make bad choices? What role does money, gender, and class play in those life choices and opportunities? These perennial problems were at the heart of three major novels in the 19th Century: Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, and Middlemarch. We will explore changing ideas about these questions as we move through the 19th c. and reflect on what these works have to say to us today as they deeply reflect on human nature and the choices we make. We will also watch some of the many movies and mini-series made from these popular books and consider the choices screenwriters and directors have made in turning these novels into films. Students will write informal analysis/reflection papers on the readings and movies and will write one formal paper and do an individual project. A previous college-level literature or LARS course is desirable, but not required.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMAmamotoIEXGrading: Student Option.
Also meets 1:30 - 4:00pm on TR in VH 302.
GEG-115-00135158Sports GeographyCRITICAL SPORTS GEOGRAPHY: IDENTITY, GLOBALIZATION, AND THE PRODUCTION OF URBAN SPACE.  This course explores the local, regional, national, and global nature of professional sports. Furthermore, the course will explore the complex racial, gendered, and ethnic politics of sports. The impact of sports stadiums on the urban landscape as well as the increasing globalization of sports will be critically investigated in the course. To illustrate the content of the class, emphasis will be given to basketball, baseball, soccer, and hockey. The course requires attendance to sporting events in the area.M T W R F11:00AM01:30PMVillanuevaIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $50.
GER-120-00135215What's German/Germany?GERMANY: MORE THAN THE ALPS, BEER AND CASTLES.  Germany's people and culture are more diverse than the commonly held stereotype. Through a week's stay in each of three areas of Germany, Ostfriesland in northwestern Germany, Berlin in east central Germany, and Munich in southern Germany, students will increase their awareness of Germany's diversity, challenging the stereotype of Germans and the German culture. Through interaction with local people and visiting historical and cultural sites in these three geographic areas, students will learn about the political, economic, and social influences that shape Germany's cultural identity, and will attempt to answer the question "What is German?" Students will journal and write reflection papers to document their learning.   BranstadIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 5-7 at 10:30am-3:00pm
in CON 126.
Meeting time includes 1 hour lunch break.
GRE-100-00135159Immersion Greek IThis course is an introduction to ancient Greek and prepares students to jump straight into second semester Greek (GRE-102) and fulfill the College's language requirement. Taking this course will also improve students' understanding of how language works, enhance English vocabulary (including technical vocabularies such as scientific and medical terms), introduce them to Greek culture, and lay the groundwork for going on to read great works of literature, from Homer's poems through Plato to the New Testament. There will be daily homework and quizzes, a weekly test, and a final exam. Homework help will be offered in the afternoons by the instructor and Greek tutors, and there will be extracurricular opportunities to appreciate Greek culture and cuisine.M T W R F09:00AM11:30AMDugdaleIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
Optional language lab at 1:00-4:00pm on MTWR
in OM 205.
HES-102-00135191Begin TennisCourse objectives include developing basic tennis stroke skills, game skills, and gaining cognitive knowledge regarding tennis as a recreational lifetime activity.M W F08:30AM10:00AMCarlsonACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-105-00135192BadmintonThis course is designed to introduce and enhance the skills of the game, including strategies, scoring, and shots.M W F08:00AM09:30AMMoeACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-105-00235193BadmintonThis course is designed to introduce and enhance the skills of the game, including strategies, scoring, and shots.M W F10:30AM12:00PMBanseACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-108-00135194VolleyballStudents are introduced to skills, rules, and offensive/defensive strategies associated with this lifetime activity. Participation improves fitness and skill development.M W F12:30PM02:00PMEckheartACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-116-00135196Weight TrainingStudents are introduced to skills, techniques, muscle physiology, and safety. After learning how to set up a personalo strength training program, students are better able to set goals to improve and maintain lifetime activity. Both free weights and machines are used.M W F10:30AM12:00PMEberhardtACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-127-00135197Pilates ConditioningThis course will offer a mixture of Pilates, yoga and calisthenics training.M W F12:30PM02:00PMMoreACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-210-00135178Physical WellbeingEAT MOVE SLEEP: RADICAL CHANGES IN JUST A FEW MINUTES A DAY! Feeling tired, stressed, out of shape, or pulled in one too many directions? If you are like most people, establishing balance in one's life can be a real challenge. This course is designed for students interested in improving their physical wellbeing. Join us in the Department of Health & Exercise Science as we experientially navigate our way toward a personal understanding of improved nutrition, physical activity, and sleep patterns. Students will gain knowledge through lectures, outside readings and research, guest speakers, and the implementation of a campaign to promote wellbeing. Start your journey toward wellbeing this January!M T W R F08:00AM10:00AMJordanIEXGrading: ABCDF.
HES-213-00135160Youth Sport WellbeingYOUTH, SPORT, AND EMOTIONAL WELL-BEING.  Students will gain an understanding of the nature of emotional health and principles and theory guiding successful development. They will explore the nature of multiple dimensions of participation in sport, including fear, aggression, achievement, stress, drugs, addiction, and relationships and gather various approaches to the resolution of common issues in youth sport. Students will be required to participate in several reflections of their personal philosophies related to coaching. In addition, students will complete a comprehensive literature review, perform case study analysis, conduct an athlete/parent interview, and perform observation and analysis of different coaching styles.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMLarsonIEXGrading: ABCDF.
HES-242-00135216Olympic Quest: EuropeOLYMPIC QUEST: EXAMINING THE PRE- AND POST-WAR MODERN OLYMPIADS OF GERMANY, FRANCE, ENGLAND, & IRELAND. This course will investigate the history of the modern Olympic games set in the context of pre- and post-World War I and II through cultural, philosophical, societal, and athletic means. Beginning in the homeland of the most controversial modern games, Olympic Quest traces the path of the modern games through Germany, France, England, and Ireland. Through daily fieldwork and excursions, interaction with guest speakers and guides, reflective journaling practices, course readings and written papers, and instructor and student-led presentations, students will have the opportunity to interact with the origins of the modern Olympic games by participating, attending, and experientially reflecting on engagement within the various venues.   BanksIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch breaks.
Meets on campus Jan. 5-8 at 8:00am-
2:30pm in BH 101.
HES-318-00135224Sr January AT ClinicalJanuary Senior Athletic Training Clinical Lab This course provides athletic training students the opportunity to participate in clinical education, discuss evidence based practice, and become trained in the Graston Technique.M T W R F  Momsen Grading: ABCDF.
Athletic Training majors only.
HIS-102-00135179Minnesota HistoryThis course surveys Minnesota history from the region's earliest settlement by American Indians through the present. We will explore the importance of Minnesota's geography, the state's role in agriculture and industry, Minnesota's political culture, and the diversity of peoples who have populated the state. We will pay particular attention to how Minnesota history is presented to general audiences (what is known as "public history"). In addition to this overview of Minnesota history, we will actually "do" history in the course. Each student will undertake a project in which s/he researches some topic of Minnesota history and prepares a presentation based on that research.M T W R F09:00AM12:30PMLaVigneIEXGrading: ABCDF.
HIS-107-00135222Lat Am Sex/Race/DangerSEX, RACE, AND DANGER IN LATIN AMERICA. This course encourages studenta to explore the power of ideas about men and women, racial difference, sex and sexuality in Latin America from the colonial period to the 21st century. Through readings, film, lecture, discussion and experiential learning, students will explore how scholars have come to employ concepts of gender, race, and sexuality to understand phenomena as diverse as colonization, empire, the nation state, economic development, and citizenship. Students will develop their own understandings and approaches to the ubiquitous dynamics of race, class, gender and power. The experiential component of the course involves student groups writing their own play or screen play. M T W R F12:30PM03:30PMIckesIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
HIS-205-00135163Power, Protest, ChangePOWER, PROTEST, AND SOCIAL CHANGE SINCE THE 1950S. This course will investigate the history of resistance movements, freedom struggles, and dissent in twentieth-century America. This course has two goals. First, it will introduce students to concepts and theories of social movements through the study of a selective history of political struggles in the United States. Second, it will guide students to identify urgent social justice issues that we should address as a class and, through community engagement, develop preliminary models, strategies, and a blueprint to analyze and realize collective visions of participatory democracy.M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMVongIEXGrading: ABCDF.
IDS-220-00135212Sweden TodaySWEDEN TODAY SEMINAR: TRADITION AND CHANGE. This integrative course in the Semester in Sweden program assists students in shaping connections among and reflecting on the courses and on-site experiences offered in this semester program. Course content explores significant issues and events in contemporary Sweden through course materials, program activities, and personal encounters. A substantial amount of group discussion, writing, and public presentations are required, culminating in a final integrative project designed by the student with approval by the faculty leader. This course counts towards the Scandinavian Studies major.   JeremiasonIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Semester in Sweden Program.
MCS-148-00135171Android Apps for AllThis course is for students with no prior programming experience. Students will gain hands-on experience developing Android apps using the MIT App Inventor 2 environment. To gain maximum benefit from the course, the student should provide his or her own Android phone or tablet. If you have prior programming experience, please don't register for this course. M T W R F10:30AM02:30PMHailperinIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
MCS-273-00135164Intro C++ ProgrammingINTRODUCTION TO C++ PROGRAMMING.  This course teaches the fundamentals of program design using the C++ programming language. The course covers programming techniques of loops, recursion, pointers, and functions. This course discusses design strategies such as modular and object-oriented programming. Students will learn to program using tools available on a POSIX-compliant operating system. The course has a substantial lab component in which students will complete programming assignments and one large project. Students are expected to do three to four hours of work outside of class per day.M T W R F09:00AM10:00AMSkulrattanakulchaiIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Lab meets 10:30am-2:20pm on MTWRF in OHS 326.
MUS-100-00135165Show Choir TechSHOW CHOIR: HISTOY & TECHNIQUES. Since its inception in the 1970s, show choir has continued to gain momentum as a popular music genre in the United States and abroad. With the recent success of the hit television show, "Glee," enthusiasm for show choir has never been higher. This course will take you on an in-depth look at every aspect of the popular phenomenon. You will learn how shows are constructed, work with professionals in the show choir industry, and how to assess production quality. You will be performing within a large group setting (singing and dancing) in this class on a daily basis--culminating in a public performance. No previous show choir, dance, or singing experience is required--just your willingness to try new things!M T W R F10:30AM01:30PMDeanIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $20.
MUS-110-00135181History & Cultr of JazzSURVEY OF THE HISTORY AND CULTURE OF JAZZ. This highly interactive music appreciation course explores the evolution of jazz over the past 100+ years through the examination of a multitude of recordings, videos, and artist interviews. Class sessions will provide insight into the birth of jazz in the "melting pot" of turn-of-the-century New Orleans, its migration up the Mississippi River, the Swing Era, Bebop, Post-Bop, and the state of Jazz today. The relationship between Jazz and its often controversial culture (race, sex, drugs, socio-economics, and political climate throughout the 20th century) will be departures for academic conversation and debate.M T W R F11:00AM01:00PMStampsIEXGrading: ABCDF.
MUS-156-00135217GAC Choir-Britain/FranceGUSTAVUS CHOIR IN THE BRITISH ISLES & FRANCE. The students will examine literature, history and culture of the United Kingdom from the Renaissance to the present day. They will discuss and respond to poems, short fiction, and drama connected to various locations on the tour. Students will write ekphrastic responses to chosen works of art and architecture and keep a journal. Music performances will be evaluated for musicianship, elements of compositional style, and interpretive growth.   AuneIEXGrading: Student Option.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 5-14 at 11:00am-1:00pm in
CON 127.
MUS-310-00135182Audition PreparationRECITAL AND GRADUATE AUDITION PREPARATION. This course is for the advanced performing musician. Students will participate in regular performance opportunities including performing for the class, for professional off-campus mentors, and for an audition panel created for constructive feedback for the students. This course will also include a focus on practice and preparation, as well as a study of appropriate audition and/or recital repertoire. We will also explore strategies for coping with and moving beyond performance anxiety so students have every tool to succeed in their future music endeavors.M T W R F12:00PM09:00PMMeffert-NelsonIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $60.
NDL-068-00135185Career Explor PreregistrationThis is a required preregistration for those students who intend to pursue a career exploration during January but have not finalized their placement at the time of registration. Only preregistered students will be eligible for the final registration in a career exploration.     Grading: Pass/Fail.
Not open to First Year students.
NDL-103-00135184Returns to EducationGEE! COLLEGE IS EXPENSIVE, IS IT WORTH IT? By the time students graduate from college, most will have spent 16 years in school. Given many years devoted to it, this course asks "What are the private and social returns to education?" This course will focus mainly on returns to college education. It asks "What are the costs and benefits of college education?" "Does college education impart skills that can be sold or used even later in life?" Or, does it simply socialize students to fit into modern society? In the end students should have a strong understanding of the debates in the literature of returns to education. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMPalamuleniIEXGrading: Student Option.
NDL-104-00135162Army LeadershipFOUNDATIONS OF ARMY LEADERSHIP. There are many well-proven Army techniques for leadership, personal development, physical well-being, values, and ethics which can be used every day and which may be of interest to students, regardless of major. Others may be interested in this subject because of connections they have with friends or family in the military. This course is designed to introduce these ideas to those with little or no previous experience with the concepts of Army leadership and officership. In the classroom you will be exposed to the basics of the Army system and what it is like to be a U.S. Army officer. Students in the course will have required reading assignments and be expected to participate in classroom discussion and class activities. Every student will give an oral presentation, write a paper, keep daily logs, and take a weekly test.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMBohlIEXGrading: ABCDF.
NDL-116-00135166Analyzing JapanUnderstanding another culture is a cumulative yet never-ending process, and especially if you are fascinated by or feel threatened by Japan, this course may be for you. For one month we will immerse ourselves in "things Japanese," as we explore the foundations of Japanese culture through an analysis of almost everything from history to sumo wrestling. Japanese language ability is not a prerequisite, although we will use a limited number of Japanese terms throughout the course to introduce cultural concepts.M T W R F10:30AM12:20PMLeitchIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $20.
NDL-155-00135218S Africa Global ServiceSOUTH AFRICA: EXAMINING GLOBAL SERVICE Students will examine global service through volunteering with Africa Jam, a non-profit organization in Cape Town, South Africa. Students will engage in service and cross-cultural conversations as well as visit several cultural sites that provide the political and cultural context of South Africa. Through service, community outreach, cross-cultural conversations, and course readings, students will examine global service and relate that knowledge to their own sense of service and understanding of the unique needs and functions of community. Students will be expected to articulate their experience through both written and oral presentations.   NewellIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 26-29 at 1:00-4:00pm in
BH 113.
NDL-206-00135161American WarfareTHE EVOLUTION OF AMERICAN WARFARE. This course is designed to provide an overview of American military history from the Revolutionary War to the present, with emphasis on the Post World War I era. It examines the cause, conduct, consequences, and historical threads of military conflict. Students will be able to employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition; examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures; use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories; and develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues.M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMBohlIEXGrading: ABCDF.
NDL-210-00135167Community ActionCOMMUNITY ACTION AND SOCIAL CHANGE.  How can we change the world? Why do we want to? How do we decide what to change? In this course, students explore the meanings of justice, citizenship and social change through community service, advocacy, and class reflection. Each student will choose one project addressing issues such as immigration, poverty, homelessness, fair trade, domestic abuse, race and gender discrimination, and land preservation. We will explore the overarching questions from ethical, historical, political and social perspectives. Assessment is based on the service, papers and class participation.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMCooperIEXGrading: Student Option.
NDL-213-00135174War on Drugs StoriesEL NARCO: LOCAL AND GLOBAL DEPICTIONS OF THE WAR ON DRUGS. This course attempts to explore the issue of drug trafficking by contrasting academic research, official policy making, journalism, artistic production, and popular and mass media representations of it. Students will compare and contrast different forms in which this issue is represented, taking into account the site from which stories are produced. This course will also enable students to trace transnational and global issues, such as migratory trends, international cultural representation of the issue, urban and rural forms of drug related violence, international military intervention, contraband, criminalization and decriminalization of specific agricultural and chemical goods, etc. Students will also participate in an outside of class group dynamic where they will have to play the role of a drug lord ("capo"), political leader, journalist, or specific constituencies affected by this problem.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMMejia SuarezIEXGrading: ABCDF.
7 hrs./wk. is required for film & TV viewing.
NDL-221-00135189Coaching for WellbeingThis course provides a foundation of wellbeing and coaching theory and practice. Students will explore basic tenets of an effective coaching dynamic, including deep listening, effective and empathic communication, and tools for self-development. We will examine the core building blocks for optimal wellbeing from a holistic perspective. In coaching for wellbeing, each person is recognized as an intrinsically well, whole, and wise being, who is the ultimate expert in his or her journey. As self-development is integral to coaching others, students will explore their own development and wellbeing. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMSommersIEXGrading: Student Option.
NDL-243-00135168ForensicsThis course is focused on participation in extracurricular forensic activities (speech and debate). Forensics involves preparation for and participation in speaking activities in environments other than the classroom. Students are expected to engage in intercollegiate forensics tournaments. Students may participate in public speaking or interpretation of literature.M T W R F10:30AM02:30PMKadlecekIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meeting time includes lunch break.
NDL-247-00135225Prin Sports EthicsPRINCIPLES OF SPORTS ETHICS.  The course explores meaning in sport at levels deeper than wins and losses. It seeks understanding and explanation of concepts such as competition, sportsmanship, and fair play. Students will examine the values and ethical frameworks of many different sporting cultures as well as their own. Issues such as moral development, player, coach, parent, and fan sport behavior, violence in sport, and the influence of sport on cultural and ethical values will be examined, discussed, and critiqued.M T W R F10:30AM01:00PMValentiniIEXGrading: ABCDF.
NDL-350-00135219One Voice in TanzaniaWITH ONE VOICE IN TANZANIA. This course is designed for students who are interested in exploring health in Tanzania from a holistic perspective that regards one's physical, emotional and spiritual wellbeing as intricately enmeshed. Students will interact directly with people in rural and urban health care settings, as well as spend time being part of a rural village's daily life. Because music plays an important role in Tanzanian culture, students will have numerous opportunities to join the people of Tanzania in singing songs in Swahili. Students will write daily narratives that reflect on the meaning of this experience. Using VanManen's phenomenological approach, students will explore the lived experience of the role that music plays in creating a sense of wellbeing amongst Tanzanians. Students will express that meaning through photo voice. Other expected course work consists of required attendance during the pre-trip seminar week, readings and pre-Tanzania group presentations on health variances, economy and healthcare, music as a healing modality in Tanzania, etc. In Tanzania, students will participate in interactive assignments with Tanzanians and evening discussions. Attendance and participation is required in all group activities. The Tanzanian experience will begin at Kilimanjaro, visiting the Maasi Girls School along with public hospitals in Arusha and Moshi. The course will continue south to Iringa, Ilula, and off the beaten path to Tungamalenga and area Maasi villages. Students will go on safari in Ruaha National Park and visit historic Bagamoyo.   ZustIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
POL-107-00135169Hollywood & PoliticsU.S. POLITICS, THE VIEW FROM HOLLYWOOD. Politics has always been a major theme for the American film industry. Controversies over the historical accuracy and political intent of films such as JFK and Malcolm X demonstrate that movies have the capacity to influence public attitudes towards specific figures and the political culture itself. This course will analyze several films, deliberately spanning the time period from the Great Depression to the present, to see what they tell us about the political culture of their time, and what messages (if any) they have for contemporary politics. Students will watch and discuss approximately 15 films, and will complete two exams and two papers (topics to be determined).M T W R F12:30PM03:20PMGilbertIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
POL-142-00135186Baseball & Am SocietyBASEBALL AND AMERICAN SOCIETY. This course introduces students to the study of baseball, with a focus on its relationship with a number of issues in American society. It will cover race relations and the integration of baseball, its changing labor structure and the development of baseball player unions, including the Major League Baseball Players Association, and broader connections to American culture and politics. Additionally, it will examine the growing popularity of sabermetrics in the study of baseball and its use in front offices and in managerial decision-making. Ultimately, the course aims to provide students with a well-developed understanding of baseball's place in American history.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMCarterIEXGrading: Student Option.
PSY-215-00135190Eating DisordersUNDERSTANDING EATING DISORDERS. Interested in learning more about body image and disordered eating? In this course we will explore body image development; eating disorder classification, causes, prevention, and treatment; cultural factors (e.g., gender, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation) and how they interact with disordered eating; "fat talk," social comparison, and other processes by which we transmit body-related messages; and more. Through a variety of activities, including discussions, films, guest speakers, and field trips, we will explore the most pressing issues of body image and disordered eating facing our society today, and develop social media outreach campaigns to address these issues, head on.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMBucchianeriIEXGrading: ABCDF.
PSY-242-00135170Forensic PsychologyThis course will examine the application of psychology to the criminal and civil justice systems, with specific focus on relevant aspects of social and clinical psychology. We will learn about various approaches to the psychological study of the law, psychologists' roles within the criminal and civil legal system, moral dilemmas within the law, police psychology, eyewitness testimony, expert witness testimony, evaluation of criminal suspects, competency to stand trial, insanity pleas, jury selection and decision making, civil commitment, sentencing, and prison psychology. As a result of self-direction and personal interest, students will gain an understanding of subspecialty areas through individual projects.M T W R01:30PM04:00PMLloydIEXGrading: ABCDF.
SPA-125-00135220Spanish in Costa RicaINTENSIVE SPANISH IN COSTA RICA. Students will travel to Costa Rica where they will study primarily the Spanish language and culture of this small but fascinating country. The class will analyze the effects of globalization on a country that from colonial times had an agricultural based economy but has leaped into the global arena to re-brand itself as a mecca for ecotourism and high technology exports. Through language classes at a top Costa Rican language institute, homestays and visits to a variety of sites such as national parks, rainforests and public sites, the students will be able to identify the issues that are currently changing the country and draw their own conclusions. They will write a final 4-5 page paper, due upon return to Gustavus. At the language institute, students will have daily assignments, a weekly test and a final exam.   TaylorIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
T/D-107-00135198January ProductionJANUARY PLAY PRODUCTION. This course is an intensive four-week production workshop culminating in performances early in February. The work is selected annually and is part of the production season of the Theatre and Dance Department. In alternate years, a musical is produced in conjunction with the Department of Music. The daily schedule may include some combination of acting, singing, dance or instrumental rehearsals as well as scenery and costume construction. Performers and musicians may also be assigned to production crews. There will be opportunities to discuss the work as it progresses with the directors and designers to gain insight into the theatrical process. Students wishing to perform must audition in late October or early November. Limited spaces are availabe for students interested only in working on technical crews, and they must interview with the Technical Director in October or November and register for T/D-211, 212, or 213. Performers and musicians must be available for rehearsals and performances in February.M T W R F10:30AM05:00PMSehamIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch breaks.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00 - 10:00pm.
T/D-111-00135199Scene/Props PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit. Permission of instructor is required.M T W R F  WilkensIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
T/D-112-00135200Light/Sound PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F  WilkensIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
T/D-113-00135201Costume PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F09:30AM04:30PMMcConnellIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch breaks.
T/D-115-00135202Asstnt Stage MngrThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:00PMMaatmanIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch breaks.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00 - 10:00pm.
T/D-211-00135203Scene/Props PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:30PMWilkensIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch breaks.
T/D-212-00135204Light/Sound PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F  WilkensIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
T/D-213-00135205Costume PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:00PMMcConnellIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch breaks.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00 - 10:00pm.
T/D-215-00135206Stage ManagementThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:00PMMaatmanIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch breaks.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00 - 10:00pm.
T/D-237-00135187Costume ConstructionHANDS-ON COSTUME CONSTRUCTION. Do you love Project Runway? Would you like to learn how to make clothes that appear on stage? Then this class is for you! We will be building the costumes for the January production. No previous theatre or sewing experience necessary. You will learn to machine and hand sew, and then we will build garments from scratch and alter existing garments which will be worn in the actual production. Assignments vary but can include costume building and alterations, crafts, hat making (millinery), and jewelry making. But it's so many hours! Most of your homework will be done in class. M T W R F09:30AM05:00PMMcConnellIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch breaks.
T/D-238-00135188Productn ConstructionHANDS-ON PRODUCTION CONSTRUCTION. Would you like to learn how to use power tools? Build cool things? Get dirty? Then this is the class for you! We will be building the scenery, props and doing lighting for the January production. No previous theatre or tool experience is needed. You will learn to safely use hand/power tools before embarking on projects that will be used in an actual production. Assignments vary but can include building, painting, research, lighting and welding. Why so many hours? Well, most of your homework will be done in class.M T W R F10:30AM05:30PMWilkensIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meets Fridays at 10:30am-2:30pm & 4:30-5:30pm.
Meeting time includes 1 hour lunch break.
T/D-272-00135207Interm Creative ExpINTERMEDIATE CREATIVE EXPERIENCE.  This course provides a mentored opportunity to gain hands-on experience in a particular focus area of theatre arts. Working with a faculty advisor, students will undertake a specific project integral to the production of the January Interim theatre production. Students will be integrally involved at every level of production, and will have a specific responsibility/role in the design, directing, or performance process.M T W R F  McConnellIEXGrading: ABCDF.