NameSynonymShort TitleDescriptionMeeting DaysStart TimeEnd TimeFacultyArea ApprovalsComments
ART-107-00137789Web Design WorkshopThis course gives students the basic visual and technical skills for creating engaging websites. Students will take part in class exercises that will serve as the basis from which a larger website project will stem from. Effective use of color, imagery, and elements of design as well as issues of interactivity will all be addressed in this course. Software used will offer students an understanding of how different approaches to web development affect both the creation and display of content.M T R F10:30AM01:00PMLukeIEXGrading: ABCDF.
BIO-108-00137769Neurobiology: EmotionsSHAKESPEARE ON MY MIND. Emotions have been extensively explored in classic literature. More recently, neurobiologists have become intrigued with how these emotions are generated in the brain. In class, we will review the current state of knowledge in the science of emotions. Through the study of Shakespeare's plays, we will gain understanding of how emotional themes develop and how students react to a play. Students will compile a portfolio from group discussions, writing scripts and acting out of scenes. The class will seek to model emotional responses given the scientific understanding and experiences gained to suggest ways to enhance or mitigate our responses. M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMQaziIEXGrading: ABCDF.
BIO-205-00137792Marine ConservationCASE STUDIES IN MARINE CONSERVATION. Most of humanity lives adjacent to the ocean, and we all depend upon a healthy marine realm. Students will choose an actual marine environmental issue and create a practical plan that helps solve it. To do this, we will rapidly acquire knowledge regarding life history, population dynamics, community ecology, and physical oceanography. Yet, to be effective, student management solutions must incorporate local political structures, economic tools, and sociological issues. Class activities include extensive reading of scientific literature, active discussion, examination of marine life in film and laboratory, policy debates, and oral presentations. M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMCarlinIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $11.
Lab meets 12:30 - 2:30pm on W in NHS 324.
CHE-210-00137743NanomaterialsWHAT'S THE BIG DEAL? EXAMINING THE SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, AND APPLICATION OF METAL NANOMATERIALS. The study of nanomaterials (materials with novel properties because of their size) is a rapidly growing field because of the broad applicability of the materials as well as the techniques used. This course will introduce you to noble metal (gold and silver) nanomaterials and is designed to give students a hands-on experience in both lecture and lab learning about noble metal nanomaterial synthesis, characterization, and applications. There will be visits by scientists currently in the field of nanomaterials. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMVolkertIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meeting time includes a lunch break on TR.
Lab meets 12:30 - 3:30pm on TR in NHS 306.
CHE-215-00137716Chem Research MethodsRESEARCH METHODS IN CHEMISTRY. An in-depth research experience is often a critical motivating factor for students that ultimately choose a career path in the sciences. This course will provide students with opportunities to gain experience in chemistry research methods and to apply them to solving real scientific problems. The specific laboratory techniques learned will depend on the instructor's area of research interest, but may include experience with modern research instrumentation, advanced synthesis methods, and/or methods of data analysis, for example. Students will also execute searches of the scientific literature, and present the results of their work both orally and in writing.M T W R F08:30AM04:00PMRussellIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Permission Required.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch
breaks.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Lab meets in NHS 207.
CHE-215-00237685Chem Research MethodsRESEARCH METHODS IN CHEMISTRY. An in-depth research experience is often a critical motivating factor for students that ultimately choose a career path in the sciences. This course will provide students with opportunities to gain experience in chemistry research methods and to apply them to solving real scientific problems. The specific laboratory techniques learned will depend on the instructor's area of research interest, but may include experience with modern research instrumentation, advanced synthesis methods, and/or methods of data analysis, for example. Students will also execute searches of the scientific literature, and present the results of their work both orally and in writing.M T W R F09:00AM04:00PMBurIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Meets 9:30am-2:30pm on Fridays.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch
breaks.
Lab meets in NHS 301.
CHN-111-00137694Chinese CultureINSIGHTS INTO CHINESE CULTURE. This course will examine the ancient world of China from its early slave society through late fuedal China. It will introduce traditional ways of thinking that ancient Chinese perceive themselves and their environment. By reading the English text of Chinese philosophies( Confucianism, Taoism, etc.), ancient China's imperial power development and foreign trade between ancient China and other countries, students will enrich their understanding of both Chinese cultural values and their own cultural identity. In this class, we will attempt to answer questions as: Why is feudal China able to maintain its unity during the long history of over 2000 years? What role do religions shape ancient Chinese people's outlook on nature and life? How are cultures reflected through a country's architecture and artifacts? The class is a mixture of lectures, group discussions, film-watching and a one-day field trip to a museum in Minneapolis.   M T W R F01:30PM03:30PMLiIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $5.
Meets 10:30am-12:30pm on Fridays.
COM-202-00137744IntertextualityINTERTEXTUALITY AND INTERSECTIONALITY.  Intersections of identity influence who we are and how we communicate and negotiate the world in which we live. Media, including movies, magazines, books, television, all play a role in shaping our identities. To explore personal identity construction, this course will analyze scholarly literature, examine popular and personal texts/narratives, and consider influences and implications. Through scholarly readings, papers, and performances, students will explore the ways in which identities are fluid and influenced by cultures in which we live. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMZsoharIEXGrading: ABCDF.
COM-213-00137682Food as CommunicationStudents will examine how food speaks to us as well as how we speak about food. Food communicates; its smell, taste, appearance, texture, and sound shape how we respond as consumers. Our relationship to food is also intimately connected to our identity. What we eat as well as how we talk about food is situational and cultural. Students will analyze food marketing as well as food debates over the science, art, economics, culture, and performance of food. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the digital realm shapes our perspectives on food. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMConnersIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Initially open only to students with
sophomore standing.
CUR-220-00137790Musical UnderstandingThis course provides students with an understanding and appreciation of the nature and place of music in contemporary culture. Music is a rich source of diversity of cultural influences as well as musical periods, styles, and media. The composer's perspective, the performer's role and the listener's responsibility provide points of departure for considering the individual's contributions to music and communal reaction to differing types of music or musical developments. Students will be involved in activities such as listening to recorded performances of music, attending performances of music on and off campus, writing papers for class presentations, discussing special topics, and participating directly in musical performance.M T W R F10:30AM01:30PMKnoepfelIEXGrading: ABCDF.
E/M-104-00137726Personal FinanceThis course is designed to help students understand the impact of personal financial decisions. Topics covered will include financial management, spending and credit, buying a home and auto, understanding insurance (health, auto, home, life), saving and investing, retirement and estate planning, and personal income taxes. Students will compile personal financial statements and budgets; demonstrate knowledge of finance, debt, and credit management; and evaluate and understand insurance and taxes. This course will provide a foundational understanding for making informed personal financial decisions.M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMJirikIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Lab meets 11:30am-12:30pm in BH 303.
E/M-206-00137777Entrepreneurs-LasVegasENTREPRENEURIAL & CREATIVE THINKING--VEGAS STYLE.  Las Vegas may be one of the best places in which to ask students to consider thinking creatively about new and mature ventures, to engage with service work in support of Gustavus' core values, and to encounter vivid examples of where business decisions meet ethics. Students will conduct site visits at different exemplar organizations all invested in revitalizing Vegas from a tourism-dependent place to a much more diversified economy. Students will keep a reflection journal, conduct an action research project, and present a recommendation for creatively examining Vegas' potential development.    Lund DeanIEXGrading: Student Option.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 4-8 and Jan. 25-29 at
12:30-3:20pm in BH 119.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
E/M-207-00137798Evol US Power IndustryMONOPOLY, COMPETITION, ENVIRONMENTALISM AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY IN THE UNITED STATES. This survey course covers the evolution of the Electric Power Industry in the United States from its early days when Thomas Edison installed power generators for freestanding buildings through today when most power is generated at large central stations, transported from those stations over high-voltage lines and distributed over lower voltage lines. It will cover the emergence and collapse of public utility holding companies during the 1920s & 1930s, the rapid growth of the 1950s & 1960s, the impact of the Energy Crisis and environmental laws of the 1970s & 1980s, and the introduction of competition into power generation during the 1970s through today.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PM IEXGrading: ABCDF.
E/M-215-00137745Getting Your Dream JobBRANDING, MARKETING & SELLING YOURSELF TO GET THE JOB OF YOUR DREAMS. Imagine you're interviewing for the job of your dreams. The manager asks one question: "Why should we hire you?" It should be the easiest questions to answer, but most students panic. What's your answer? Does it differentiate you from the dozens of other students or recent graduates applying? This course will help students understand what makes them unique and how to answer that question. How? By helping students apply the same principles and tools Fortune 500 companies use for branding, marketing and business development (sales) to themselves. Students will gain a competitive advantage and jumpstart on their job/internship searches.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PM IEXGrading: ABCDF.
E/M-278-00137746Fin Statement AnalysisFINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS. Financial analysis is the selection, evaluation and interpretation of financial data and other pertinent information to assist in evaluating the operating performance and financial condition of the company. The objective of this course is to provide students with the theoretical and practical tools and methods to effectively navigate the complexity of financial and non-financial data, be able to draw inferences from past performance and to apply that information for future financial decision making. The course will combine both theoretical and practical applications of Financial Analysis. The course is designed to introduce Financial Statement Analysis topics tested on the CFA level I examination.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PM IEXGrading: ABCDF.
EDU-267-00137778Peru: Service LearningEDUCATION, HEALTHCARE AND POVERTY IN PERU: A SERVICE LEARNING EXPERIENCE. Students will provide daily service by teaching English to local youth and adults or by working in local clinics. Students will prepare and execute English lessons or assist local medical personnel and participate in other service activities needed by the community. Daily reflections and evening discussions will be required. A final reflective summary paper will be due at the end of the experience.    PittonIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 5-6 in MAT 102.
EDU-268-00137766Orientation to TeachingThis course is designed to help students assess their interests in teaching. The student spends one month working in an elementary or secondary school or other approved setting as a full-time teacher assistant. A journal, selected readings and on-line discussion provide opportunities for reflection during the experience in a school setting. Written assignments and attendance at a culminating retreat are required. Students attend an organizational meeting in the early fall to receive information regarding school placement options and course requirements. This course counts as one of a maximum of four internship credits allowed in the degree program.   VizenorIEX EXPGrading: Pass/Fail.
Course Fee: $20.
Permission Required.
ENG-140-00137748Horror FilmsThis course focuses on how representations of the "undead" have figured in Western culture in the past two centuries. We will cover both "high" and popular literature and a range of films from art cinema to exploitation films, horror to science fiction. Among the icons of these "undead" are Frankenstein's monster, the vampire, zombies and those who have met violent deaths, such as the "heroes" of the Nightmare on Elm Street and Candyman series. We will be concerned with how and why these figures haunt Western societies (especially the United States) and will read analyses ranging over aesthetic theories and sociological analyses.M T W R F11:30AM02:30PMCobbIEXGrading: ABCDF.
ENG-202-00137768Editing & PublishingDIGITAL LITERATURE: EDITING AND PUBLISHING AN ONLINE LITERARY MAGAZINE. Experience the world of professional editing and publishing right from campus! This course will create a hands-on, working publishing house at Gustavus, to edit and publish the first issue of a new national literary magazine. Students will work through all phases of the publishing process (Acquisition, Editorial, and Marketing), practicing the techniques and procedures of professional editing. Students will read submitted works of writing and art, and discuss which ones to publish as an editorial board. They will also study the business of the publishing industry, evaluate other literary magazines, and create a website design for our magazine. M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMLawleyIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Initially open only to students with
sophomore standing.
GEG-155-00137780Landscape Evol-EcuadorTHE EVOLUTION OF LANDSCAPE IN ECUADOR AND THE GALAPAGOS. Within a compact area, only slightly larger than Minnesota, Ecuador offers landscape diversity ranging from semi-desert tropical islands to the icy slopes of some of the highest volcanoes on earth and social diversity ranging from the rapidly modernizing to the resolutely traditional. In this course, we will study the factors that influence ecological and cultural diversity and explore the tight interlinkages that exist between social and environmental systems in this rapidly evolving landscape. Activities include quantitative and qualitative data collection, group discussion, interviews of indigenous community members, reflective writing, and extensive but novice-level exercise (hiking, walking, and snorkeling).    La FrenierreIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
GER-120-00137771What's German/Germany?GERMANY: MORE THAN THE ALPS, BEER AND CASTLES.  Germany's people and culture are more diverse than the commonly held stereotype. Through a week's stay in each of three areas of Germany, Ostfriesland in northwestern Germany, Berlin in east central Germany, and Munich in southern Germany, students will increase their awareness of Germany's diversity, challenging the stereotype of Germans and the German culture. Through interaction with local people and visiting historical and cultural sites in these three geographic areas, students will learn about the political, economic, and social influences that shape Germany's cultural identity, and will attempt to answer the question "What is German?" Students will journal and write reflection papers to document their learning.   BranstadIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 4-6 at 10:30am-2:30pm
in CON 126.
Meeting time includes 1 hour lunch break.
GRE-100-00137695Immersion Greek IThis course is an introduction to ancient Greek and prepares students to jump straight into second semester Greek (GRE-102) and fulfill the College's language requirement. Taking this course will also improve students' understanding of how language works, enhance English vocabulary (including technical vocabularies such as scientific and medical terms), introduce them to Greek culture, and lay the groundwork for going on to read great works of literature, from Homer's poems through Plato to the New Testament. There will be daily homework and quizzes, a weekly test, and a final exam. Homework help will be offered in the afternoons by the instructor and Greek tutors, and there will be extracurricular opportunities to appreciate Greek culture and cuisine.M T W R F09:00AM11:30AMEastonIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
Optional Language Lab is available daily at
1:00-4:00pm in OM 205.
GWS-212-00137749Actualizing ActivismACTUALIZING ACTIVISM: HOW CAN WE MAKE SOCIAL JUSTICE HAPPEN? Social justice is an often discussed subject that we as a society hope to eventually "get to." What does it mean to work to attain social justice? What are the varieties of ways we can work to actualize our social justice values? And do these methods work? This course will interrogate these questions through related readings, interaction with local and national activist organizations and figures, and assignments and discussions geared toward honing your own ideas about social justice. Students will engage in critical thinking about their own social justice ideas, and see how these ideas do and do not come to fruition within their own communities.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMHusainIEXGrading: ABCDF.
HES-102-00137782Begin TennisCourse objectives include developing basic tennis stroke skills, game skills, and gaining cognitive knowledge regarding tennis as a recreational lifetime activity.M W F08:30AM10:00AMCarlsonACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-105-00137729BadmintonThis course is designed to introduce and enhance the skills of the game, including strategies, scoring, and shots.M W F10:30AM12:00PMBanseACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-116-00137730Weight TrainingStudents are introduced to skills, techniques, muscle physiology, and safety. After learning how to set up a personalo strength training program, students are better able to set goals to improve and maintain lifetime activity. Both free weights and machines are used.M W F10:30AM12:00PMBockenstedtACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-122-00137733RelaxationThis course is designed to introduce and practice various ways to elicit the relaxation response. Students will assess personal stress levels and responses and participate in a variety of techniques to help them relax. Techniques such as progressive relaxation, autogenics, tai chi, yoga, massage and meditation will be covered in class.M W F10:30AM12:00PMOttoACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-123-00137732YogaStudents will learn and practice a variety of Hatha Yoga postures followed by a short period of meditation. There are short written assignments about the underlying principles of yoga as a means to unite the mind, body and spiri. Also included is a short essay on yin and yang and yama and niyamas.M W F08:30AM10:00AMOttoACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-127-00137783Pilates ConditioningThis course will offer a mixture of Pilates, yoga and calisthenics training.M W F12:30PM02:00PMMoreACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-210-00137693Physical WellbeingEAT MOVE SLEEP--ENHANCE YOUR PHYSICAL WELLBEING.  Feeling tired, stressed, out of shape, or pulled in one too many directions? If you are like most people, establishing balance in one's life can be a real challenge. This course is designed for students interested in improving their physical wellbeing. Join us in the Department of Health & Exercise Science as we experientially navigate our way toward a personal understanding of improved nutrition, physical activity, and sleep patterns. Students will gain knowledge through lectures, outside readings and research, guest speakers, and the implementation of a campaign to promote wellbeing. Start your journey toward wellbeing this January!M T W R F08:00AM10:00AMJordanIEXGrading: ABCDF.
HES-242-00137774OlympicQuest:Cen/So AmOLYMPIC QUEST: UNDERSTANDING SPORT & LEISURE IN THE CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICAN COUNTRIES OF BRAZIL, PERU, AND MEXICO. Using a global, issues-oriented approach, Olympic Quest considers how sport, leisure, and the modern Olympic Games may inform the participant of societal and cultural differences in Brazil, Peru, and Mexico. Through daily fieldwork and excursions, interaction with guest speakers and guides, reflective journaling practices, course readings, and instructor and student-led presentations, students will have the opportunity to interact with the origins of the modern Olympic games and leisure/sporting experiences by participating, attending, and experientially reflecting on engagement within the various venues.    BanksIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
HES-318-00137731Sr January AT ClinicalJanuary Senior Athletic Training Clinical Lab This course provides athletic training students the opportunity to participate in clinical education, discuss evidence based practice, and become trained in the Graston ® Technique.M T W R F  Joos Grading: ABCDF.
Athletic Training majors only.
HIS-107-00137696Lat Am Sex/Race/DangerSEX, RACE, AND DANGER IN LATIN AMERICA. This course encourages studenta to explore the power of ideas about men and women, racial difference, sex and sexuality in Latin America from the colonial period to the 21st century. Through readings, film, lecture, discussion and experiential learning, students will explore how scholars have come to employ concepts of gender, race, and sexuality to understand phenomena as diverse as colonization, empire, the nation state, economic development, and citizenship. Students will develop their own understandings and approaches to the ubiquitous dynamics of race, class, gender and power. The experiential component of the course involves student groups writing their own play or screen play. M T W R F12:30PM04:30PMIckesIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
IDS-110-00137723Reading/Writing JazzREADING AND WRITING JAZZ. This course will explore the nature and form of Jazz music through listening then reading and writing about the music. Students will critically listen to a full spectrum of Jazz music on records, CDs, and Internet videoes. Students will also read some of the best examples of writing about Jazz, written in multiple literary genres, which may include essays, critical reviews, poetry, fiction and non-fiction prose. Students will create their own writing on and about Jazz. Students will be asked to write free expressive, creative, as well as critical pieces about the nature and form of this music.M T W R F01:00PM03:00PMBryantIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meets 12:30 - 2:30pm on Fridays.
JPN-145-00137775Japanese in TokyoINTENSIVE JAPANESE LANGUAGE STUDY IN TOKYO. In this course, students will engage in intensive language and cultural immersion at Hosei University, located in the center of Tokyo. Students with various levels of Japanese language proficiency-from beginning (with no previous experience) to advanced-may participate in this course; each student will be placed in an appropriate level class at the university. The course also offers opportunities to visit various sites of historical and cultural significance in Tokyo and its surrounding areas. In addition to the assignments and examinations (written and oral) in the Japanese language course, students will engage in reflection on their intercultural experience via group discussions and essays.    SakuragiIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
MCS-223-00137739Intro to CryptographyINTRODUCTION TO CODES AND CRYPTOGRAPHY. This course introduces the mathematics of making and breaking codes, from ancient times to the present. Cryptographic systems blend technique, creativity, and subterfuge, forming a fascinating area of study with many areas of mathematics contributing to their analysis. Although this is primarily a mathematical course, we will consider the role of codes and codebreakers throughout history and some ethical questions that modern researchers in the field must consider.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMSiehlerIEXGrading: Student Option.
Afternoons (2:00 - 4:00pm) are available for
group work and consultation.
Students should see the instructor if they do
not have the required pre-requisite.
MCS-358-00137686Math Model BuildingMATHEMATICAL MODEL BUILDING. An introductory study of the formulation of mathematical models to represent, predict, and control real-world situations, especially in the social and biological sciences. The course will use ideas from calculus, linear algebra, and probability theory to describe processes that change in time in some regular manner, which may be deterministic or stochastic. Typical topics are Markov and Poisson processes, discrete and continuous equations of growth, and computer simulation. In addition, students will work on their own mathematical modeling projects.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMLoFaroIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Open only to Juniors and Seniors.
MUS-108-00137735Art Music/Pop CultureTHE CROSSROADS OF 20th AND 21st CENTURY AMERICAN ART MUSIC AND POPULAR CULTURE. This course will explore connections between popular culture and art music. From video games to the concert hall, musical theater to anime and the silver screen, a great deal of music written in America during the past century has reflected society and culture. Through debate and discussion, connections between music, composers, and culture will be explored. Projects will include multimedia presentations, including playing and discussing video games, in-class debates, library research, writing, listening and discussing art music and its impact on today's society, environment, global health, terrorism, transportation, the economy, etc.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMMillerIEXGrading: ABCDF.
MUS-156-00137724Gustavus ChoirA mixed-voice ensemble of approximately seventy members which studies and performs significant historical and contemporary choral repertoire. A concert tour is conducted each year, including an international tour every fourth year. Open by audition.M T W R F04:00PM06:00PMAune Grading: Student Option.
Friday rehearsal is at 4:30 - 6:30pm.
MUS-156-00237793Gustavus ChoirA mixed-voice ensemble of approximately seventy members which studies and performs significant historical and contemporary choral repertoire. A concert tour is conducted each year, including an international tour every fourth year. Open by audition.M T W R F04:00PM06:00PMAune Grading: Student Option.
Friday rehearsal is at 4:30 - 6:30pm.
MUS-170-00137773GSO-Greece & TurkeyGUSTAVUS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA AND JAZZ LAB BAND PERFORM IN GREECE AND TURKEY. This course focuses on the aural study and performance of orchestral and jazz repertoire with an emphasis on American Orchestral and Big Band Music. The juxtaposition and collaboration of the two genres will also be explored. Performances will be presented to several audiences in Greece and Turkey. The companion course, taught on campus by Alisa Rosenthal, will include study of Greece's rich contributions to Western political theory and Turkey as a crossroads between East and West. Both countries have much to offer in terms of their culture, history and current role on the world stage. In addition to the extensive rehearsal study and preparation necessary for the performances, students will attend lectures, participate in discussion, and complete reflective essays.M T W R03:30PM05:30PMLinIEXGrading: ABDCF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Rehearsal schedule on MTWRF in BRH:
GSO: 9:00-10:00am;
GSO & Jazz: 10:30am-12:00pm;
Jazz: 1:00-3:00pm (10:30am-12:30pm on F).
NDL-00-00137809UMAIE-Ecuador/Galapagos     JAN IEXPermission required.
T4660
NDL-00-00237812UMAIE-Rome     JAN IEXPermission required.
T4669
NDL-00-00337811UMAIE-England/Italy     JAN IEXPermission required.
T4662
NDL-068-00137779Career Explor PreregistrationThis is a required preregistration for those students who intend to pursue a career exploration during January but have not finalized their placement at the time of registration. Only preregistered students will be eligible for the final registration in a career exploration.     Grading: Pass/Fail.
Not open to First Year students.
NDL-100-00137684Film NoirTHE HISTORY AND ART OF FILM NOIR.  Film noir was a film movement that often emphasized moral ambiguity and sexual motivation. This course will trace the history of this movement from its literary and cinematic inception, its peak during the "classic period", to the neo-noir style of the modern era. In addition to the historical and artistic aspects of these films, the cultural implications of the movement will also be explored. This course is designed for people who love film. Course evaluation instruments include two exams, written work, and the group creation of a film noir short. Several books covering aspects of film noir history and analysis will be assigned.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMSaulnierIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Add'l time for film viewing is req'd on TR at
1:30-4:00pm in OHS 220.
NDL-101-00137750Social&Art of KnittingINTERWOVEN: WHAT IS SOCIAL AND CREATIVE ABOUT OF KNITTING? Why is knitting trendy again? How does fiber change to a work of art, comfort, and fashion? Why is the worn afghan from grandma so comforting? There are 3 foci of this course: 1. Learning basic knitting skills. (Perhaps making a slouchy hat or a snuggly scarf.) 2. Exploring knitting's connection to mathematics, science, creativity, and social responsibility. 3. Reflecting on knitting as a way to promote wellbeing and reduce stress. Students will experiment hands-on with knitting, felting, fiber dying, etc. Field trips to local fiber producing farms (sheep, lama, yak, alpaca) and the Minnesota Institute of Art will explore fiber as a contemporary art form. No experience is necessary and all are welcome. M T W F10:30AM12:30PMShieldsIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Lab meets 2:00pm - 4:00pm on T in NHS 105.
Field trips on Thurs. at 9:00am - 5:00pm are
required.
NDL-103-00137725Returns on EducationRETURNS ON EDUCATION. By the time students graduate from college, most will have spent 16 years of schooling. Given many years devoted to it, this course asks "What are the private and social returns to education?" This course will focus mainly on returns to college education. It asks "What are the costs and benefits of college education?" "Does college education impart skills that can be sold or used even later in life?" Or, does it simply socialize students to fit into modern society? In the end students should have a strong understanding of the debates in the literature of returns to education. M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMPalamuleniIEXGrading: Student Option.
NDL-104-00137770Army LeadershipFOUNDATIONS OF ARMY LEADERSHIP. There are many well-proven Army techniques for leadership, personal development, physical well-being, values, and ethics which can be used every day and which may be of interest to students, regardless of major. Others may be interested in this subject because of connections they have with friends or family in the military. This course is designed to introduce these ideas to those with little or no previous experience with the concepts of Army leadership and officership. In the classroom you will be exposed to the basics of the Army system and what it is like to be a U.S. Army officer. Students in the course will have required reading assignments and be expected to participate in classroom discussion and class activities. Every student will give an oral presentation, write a paper, keep daily logs, and take a weekly test.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PM IEXGrading: ABCDF.
NDL-108-00137752Bouncing ForwardBOUNCING FORWARD: RESILIENCY SKILLS FOR THRIVING IN COLLEGE AND BEYOND. Life is challenging, both during college and beyond. Bouncing Forward provides an introduction to the tools, concepts and principles of resilience offered by current research in the field of Positive Psychology and Mind-Body Medicine. This course is grounded in the Gustavus Wellbeing initiative, which identifies well-being as a choice to assume responsibility for the quality of one's life across multiple dimensions. We focus on both the theory and practice of specific tools and strategies for increasing personal resilience and the overall well-being. M T W R F09:00AM12:30PMRusinkoIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
Lab meets 10:30am - 12:30pm on MTWRF in
FAC 219.
NDL-113-00137753Building CommunitiesBUILDING COMMUNITY THROUGH CITIZEN DIPLOMACY: PETATLÁN AND ST. PETER. Did you know that St. Peter has a Sister City in Mexico called Petatlán? Have you attended one of the Learning to Serve (LTS) trips within the last 5 years or have you heard anything about these trips? Well now you have the opportunity to engage in the same topics and issues that LTS students discover while abroad in Petatlán HERE ON CAMPUS. During the month of January, we will welcome and host Petatleco students who will be visiting St. Peter and who will participate as co-learners in class. Together we will map out the script, storyboard, footage and shooting plan for a video about the Sister Cities that has been requested from the Petatlán Sister City Committee. If you attend LTS 2016 you will continue this project at length and share it with the campus, upon our return. You won't want to miss this rare IEX course. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMDwyerIEXGrading: ABCDF.
NDL-116-00137691Analyzing JapanUnderstanding another culture is a cumulative yet never-ending process, and especially if you are fascinated by or feel threatened by Japan, this course may be for you. For one month we will immerse ourselves in "things Japanese," as we explore the foundations of Japanese culture through an analysis of almost everything from history to sumo wrestling. Japanese language ability is not a prerequisite, although we will use a limited number of Japanese terms throughout the course to introduce cultural concepts.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMLeitchIEXGrading: Student Option.
Course Fee: $20.
NDL-170-00137772Cuba Religion CulturesCUBA: RELIGION, CULTURE, AND IDENTITY. Students will travel to Cuba, where we will explore the diversity of Cuba's religious practices including the African-based Yoruba religions of Santería and Palo Monte, Catholicism, Judaism, and several branches of evangelical Protestantism. We will focus on questions of religious and cultural  identities and how they are constructed and manifested into community, social and political action. Through readings, church visits, discussions, invited guest speakers, and community engagement activities we will examine the history of Cuban religions, religious identities, how religion is practiced in 2016, and how some contemporary religious sects work through popular education methodologies to serve, strengthen, and build their communities. Students will complete assigned readings, attend lectures, conduct reflective journaling on an on-going basis, submit reflective essays, and facilitate and participate in scheduled group discussions.    RathlefIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 4-8 (8:00am-4:00pm) &
Jan. 26-29 (10:30am-2:30pm) in BH 313.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch
breaks.
Meets until 2:30pm on Friday, 1/8/16.
NDL-175-00137776Wellbeing in S. AfricaTHE STRUGGLE TO BE WELL IN SOUTH AFRICA. This course seeks to examine the struggle of being well in the context of post-Apartheid South Africa. By learning from local scholars and engaging in various indigenous-led activities, participants will consider nine primary dimensions of wellbeing: Career, Emotional, Environmental, Intellectual, Physical, Relational, Spiritual, and Vocational. Through a see-judge-act methodology of reflective and experiential instruction, students will learn to think critically about the political, economical, ecological, and personal factors that contribute to both individual and communal wellbeing. As a result, participants will be empowered to view the wellbeing of one as directly related to (and dependent upon) the wellbeing of all.    KonkolIEXGrading: Student Option.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 4-5 in OM 207 at
10:30am - 2:30pm.
NDL-206-00137806American WarfareTHE EVOLUTION OF AMERICAN WARFARE. This course is designed to provide an overview of American military history from the Revolutionary War to the present, with emphasis on the Post World War I era. It examines the cause, conduct, consequences, and historical threads of military conflict. Students will be able to employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition; examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures; use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories; and develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues.M T W R F12:30PM02:30PM IEXGrading: ABCDF.
NDL-213-00137690War on Drugs StoriesLOCAL AND GLOBAL DEPICTIONS OF THE WAR ON DRUGS. This course explores the issue of drug trafficking by contrasting its different representations in cinema, television, academic research, official policy making, and journalism. This course will enable students to trace transnational and global issues, such as migratory trends, international military intervention, criminalization and decriminalization of specific agricultural and chemical goods, etc. Students will create their own way to digitally visualize an aspect that stands out from the representations studied in class. Students will also participate in a group dynamic where they will play the role of a drug lord, political leader, journalist, or specific constituencies affected by this problem.M T W R F04:30PM06:30PMMejia SuarezIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Add'l. time for film viewing is req'd. at
7:00-9:00pm in CON 128.
Initially open only to students with
sophomore standing.
NDL-243-00137808ForensicsThis course is focused on participation in extracurricular forensic activities (speech and debate). Forensics involves preparation for and participation in speaking activities in environments other than the classroom. Students are expected to engage in intercollegiate forensics tournaments. Students may participate in public speaking or interpretation of literature.M T W R F10:30AM02:30PMVoightIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
NDL-310-00137692Genealogy ResearchGENEALOGY: RESEARCH & EXPLORATION. It has been said that all history is local. With that in mind, one's family history is their most immediate connection to the past. Students completing this course will have gained a fuller understanding of their complex family histories; explored a variety of genealogy resources; used software applications; become acquainted with archival repositories, libraries, cemeteries, government offices, and relevant websites. Students are expected to conduct research, develop digital mediums, compile findings in written narrative and chart form, and present their stories in class. A laptop computer is required.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMJensonIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Initially open only to students with
sophomore standing.
PHI-113-00137754Aesthetics of NatureBEAUTY AND NATURE. Why protect the Grand Canyon from mining? Does beauty exist in the natural world objectively (as carbon does), or is it a human construct? If it is human construct, then what reason do we have to take beauty concerns seriously? This course will explore the concept of beauty and aesthetic value in nature. Theories of beauty will be examined, and students will apply them outside in nature on their own and on weekly field trips. Students will explore the role that beauty plays in decisions concerning the environment and further importance it plays in human well-being. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMFritzIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
PHY-101-00137687Physical World--El EdPHYSICAL WORLD FOR ELEMENTARY EDUCATORS. This course provides an introduction to both classical and modern physics, and is intended for elementary education majors. Topics of study include mechanics, heat, thermodynamics, wave phenomena, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, relativity, quantum theory, atomic and nuclear physics. These will be developed historically, and emphasis will be placed on topics which relate to current social issues. The approach will be quantitative, involving extensive use of algebra, but no calculus is required. Course includes a lab. Does not count toward a physics major.M T W R F09:00AM11:30AMYoungIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
Lab meets 1:30-3:30pm on TR in OHS 224.
PHY-210-00137794Sci Programming in CSCIENTIFIC PROGRAMMING IN C AND MATLAB. This course will provide an introduction to the C and Matlab computer languages and to their application to problems in physics, engineering, applied mathematics and simulations of systems. C, or common relatives such as Java and C++, continues to be one of the most commonly used computer languages. In recent years, a growing number of users in science and engineering have been using Matlab as a programming language. There will be required textbook readings, homework assignments, in-class exams, and a final project, in which students will be encouraged to develop software in an area of interest.M T W R F09:00AM12:00PMHuberIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
POL-115-00137791MN Politics & Gov't.MINNESOTA POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT. This course provides an introduction to politics and government in the state of Minnesota. The course focuses on political institutions (the governor, state legislature, and state court system), political participation by citizens, and public policy in Minnesota. Class activities include guest speakers working in Minnesota politics and government, a field trip to the Capitol, and a community engagement project related to public policy in Minnesota.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMKnutsonIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
PSY-215-00137688Eating DisordersUNDERSTANDING EATING DISORDERS. Interested in learning more about body image and disordered eating? In this course we will explore body image development; eating disorder classification, causes, prevention, and treatment; cultural factors (e.g., gender, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation) and how they interact with disordered eating; "fat talk," social comparison, and other processes by which we transmit body-related messages; and more. Through a variety of activities, including discussions, films, guest speakers, and field trips, we will explore the most pressing issues of body image and disordered eating facing our society today, and develop social media outreach campaigns to address these issues, head on.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMBucchianeriIEXGrading: ABCDF.
PSY-220-00137734Psych of Good & EvilTHE SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY OF GOOD AND EVIL. Why do people join gangs, cults, or terrorist organizations? What causes students to commit mass murder within their classrooms? What drives some people to help others--even at great personal cost--and others to ignore those in need? We will explore such questions about good and evil from a social-psychological perspective. You will gain an understanding of social psychology and its implications for the bright and dark side of human nature. A service learning component of volunteering for a local organization will allow you to better understand prosocial behavior. This class will be challenging, but also interesting, fun, and applicable to real-world human behavior. M T W R F02:30PM04:30PMJabeenIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meets 12:30 - 2:30pm on Fridays.
PSY-242-00137698Forensic PsychologyThis course will examine the application of psychology to the criminal and civil justice systems, with specific focus on relevant aspects of social and clinical psychology. We will learn about various approaches to the psychological study of the law, psychologists' roles within the criminal and civil legal system, moral dilemmas within the law, police psychology, eyewitness testimony, expert witness testimony, evaluation of criminal suspects, competency to stand trial, insanity pleas, jury selection and decision making, civil commitment, sentencing, and prison psychology. As a result of self-direction and personal interest, students will gain an understanding of subspecialty areas through individual projects.M T W R01:30PM04:00PMLloydIEXGrading: ABCDF.
REL-107-00137755Race+Religion in WireRACE AND RELIGION IN "THE WIRE". David Simon's "The Wire" is a critically acclaimed television series known for its vivid depictions of the complex interactions between race, sex, class, and religion. By way of this immersion experience in a creative and innovative work, students will critically engage issues of diversity, identity, and equality. This class will examine the  presuppositions, commitments, and practices that animate the injustices of our pluralistic society. This task will enrich students lives as they prepare for leadership and mission beyond the college experience. The course is explicitly interdisciplinary, drawing from the arts, religious studies, and the social sciences. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMVan YperenIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Meets until 1:00pm on TR.
REL-204-00137759Experiencing PassoverEXPERIENCING THE PASSOVER SEDER. This course will explore the Passover seder, a Jewish ritual of significance to Christians. We will use an anthropological perspective to discuss how the seder conveys values and behaviors from generation to generation, and how it compares to Christian practices. We will visit a grocery store to learn about kosher food, and attend a synagogue service in the Twin Cities. Students will learn enough Hebrew to read or sing some simple prayers. In the last week students will conduct a model seder. By the end, students will be prepared to knowledgeably participate in a community seder at Gustavus this spring. M T W R F10:30AM01:30PMBroidaIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
S/A-208-00137781Swahili PeoplesTHE SWAHILI PEOPLE AND THEIR CULTURE. This course will explore the richness of Swahili society and culture, using readings, video/films, folklore, dance and music. The course will examine Swahili as a way of life and a language of the peoples of coastal East Africa, largely with native Bantu origins and some Arab influence. The course will enable students to practice some of the culture's unique features including women's attire in colourful khanga, female decorations using henna, exquisite recipes using spices, beliefs in the spirits, and dance. The course will also explore Swahili culture as a system of accommodation but also resistance against full absorption by other cultures. M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMMwaipopoIEXGrading: ABCDF.
S/A-215-00137740Family Life EducationSTRENGTHENING MARRIAGES AND FAMILIES: AN INTRODUCTION TO FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION. This course will provide students with the general philosophy and broad principles of family life education. This course is designed for students who desire to teach couples and families how to strengthen their relationships. Family theories are explored and applications for creating, planning, and evaluating such educational programs are made. Applications at the community and societal level are emphasized. Ethical professional behaviors such as understanding boundaries and client confidentiality are also highlighted. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMHansenIEXGrading: ABCDF.
S/A-223-00137741Anth of Bollywood FilmBOLLYWOOD FILM: ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE.  Bollywood film, rooted in India, is now a global phenomenon. View a number of films and learn how Bollywood differs from Hollywood. Learn about Indian popular culture. There is spectacle, exotic locations and costumes, singing and dancing, and a myriad of interesting genres including romance, family dramas, history, crime, and comedy. Students will read biographies of film stars and selections on Bollywood history, film production, themes and genres. They will write reaction papers and work in groups on weekly presentations based on research, reaction, film comparison or even dramatic re-enactment, and prepare a final essay.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMPrindleIEXGrading: Student Option.
Add'l. time for film viewing is req'd. on Wed.
at 2:30-6:30pm.
T/D-107-00137700January ProductionJANUARY PLAY PRODUCTION. This course is an intensive four-week production workshop culminating in performances early in February. The work is selected annually and is part of the production season of the Theatre and Dance Department. In alternate years, a musical is produced in conjunction with the Department of Music. The daily schedule may include some combination of acting, singing, dance or instrumental rehearsals as well as scenery and costume construction. Performers and musicians may also be assigned to production crews. There will be opportunities to discuss the work as it progresses with the directors and designers to gain insight into the theatrical process. Students wishing to perform must audition in late October or early November. Limited spaces are availabe for students interested only in working on technical crews, and they must interview with the Technical Director in October or November and register for T/D-211, 212, or 213. Performers and musicians must be available for rehearsals and performances in February.M T W R F11:30AM09:30PMMacCarthyIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Permission Required.
Meeting time includes lunch & dinner breaks.
Also meets in Anderson Theatre & Kresge
Studio .
T/D-111-00137718Scene/Props PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit. Permission of instructor is required.M T W R F10:30AM05:30PMWilkensIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Meeting time includes 1 hour lunch break.
T/D-112-00137719Light/Sound PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:30PMWilkensIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Meeting time includes 1 hour lunch break.
T/D-115-00137728Asstnt Stage MngrThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:00PMMaatmanIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch
breaks.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00 - 10:00pm.
T/D-137-00137762Social Justice at GACTHE HISTORY OF SOCIAL JUSTICE AT GUSTAVUS--A DIGITAL HUMANITIES APPROACH. Learning and using a "digital humanities" approach, the class will research, analyze and communicate the history of social conflict at Gustavus over the last 20 years in the larger context of key issues on college campuses throughout the United States. Individual and group projects will explore manifestations of racism, sexism, sexual violence and homophobia on campus, and will map the specific ways in which Gustavus students, faculty, administrators and others have fought that oppression. Projects may focus on social justice work in the classroom, the arts, student life, or other venues. Students will use digital tools to develop creative ways of sharing their findings in cyberspace. M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMSehamIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Add'l. lab time will be required on MW or TR.
Initially open only to students with
sophomore standing.
T/D-203-00137763LaGringa Danza RepLA GRINGA DANZA CONTINUUM MOVEMENT TECHNIQUE AND PERFORMANCE. La Gringa Danza will be led by internationally known dancers and choreographers Jordan Klitzke and Melissa Herrada. The class will be made up of two parts, training and creation. Students will be challenged not to fulfill a technical form, but to effectively, clearly and dynamically manipulate energy along continuous routes in their bodies to create a fluid, energy filled experience. The classes will include floor work with a focus on creating functional connections within the body to transverse across the space. There will be a large emphasis on creating a shared internal rhythm with fellow dancers to create a strong communal experience in class and on stage. M T W R F10:30AM02:30PM IEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission Required.
Meeting time includes 1 hour lunch break.
Also meets 5:00 - 8:00pm.
T/D-211-00137720Scene/Props PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:30PMWilkensIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Meeting time includes 1 hour lunch break.
T/D-215-00137727Stage ManagementThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:00PMMaatmanIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch
breaks.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00 - 10:00pm.
T/D-217-00137767Arts EntrepreneurshipThis course will focus on creating art in the age of digital media. Using Schaefer Gallery and a Digital Humanities approach, students will work with guest artist John Preus creating an immersive gallery space able to house visual and performing arts exhibits. Artists of all disciplines will create or reshow projects and in doing so, explore creating art that has a digital component. Students will learn how to portray artwork digitally, use the digital as a marketing tool for the exhibit or performance, and provide patrons additional insight into the artistic process by using media to engage artists and audiences inside the gallery and in cyberspace.M T W R F10:30AM03:30PMMaatmanIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meet in Schaefer Gallery.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Meeting time includes 1 hour lunch break.
Initially open only to students with
sophomore standing.
Open only to ART, ENG, MUS, T/D majors.
ART, ENG, MUS, T/D minors may register with
permission from instructor.
T/D-237-00137702Costume ConstructionHANDS-ON COSTUME CONSTRUCTION. Do you love Project Runway? Would you like to learn how to make clothes that appear on stage? Then this class is for you! We will be building the costumes for the January production. No previous theatre or sewing experience necessary. You will learn to machine and hand sew, and then we will build garments from scratch and alter existing garments which will be worn in the actual production. Assignments vary but can include costume building and alterations, crafts, hat making (millinery), and jewelry making. But it's so many hours! Most of your homework will be done in class. M T W R F09:30AM05:30PMMcConnellIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meeting time includes 1 hour lunch break.
Does not meet on Fri. at 2:30-4:30pm.
T/D-238-00137721Productn ConstructionHANDS-ON PRODUCTION CONSTRUCTION. Would you like to learn how to use power tools? Build cool things? Get dirty? Then this is the class for you! We will be building the scenery, props and doing lighting for the January production. No previous theatre or tool experience is needed. You will learn to safely use hand/power tools before embarking on projects that will be used in an actual production. Assignments vary but can include building, painting, research, lighting and welding. Why so many hours? Well, most of your homework will be done in class.M T W R F10:30AM05:30PMWilkensIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Meeting time includes 1 hour lunch break.
T/D-272-00137722Interm Creative ExpINTERMEDIATE CREATIVE EXPRESSION. This course provides a mentored opportunity to gain hands-on experience in a particular focus area of theatre arts. Working with a faculty advisor, students will undertake a specific project integral to the production of the January Interim theatre production. Students will be integrally involved at every level of production, and will have a specific responsibility/role in the design, directing, or performance process.   WilkensIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
T/D-372-00137717Adv Creative ExpADVANCED CREATIVE EXPERIENCE.  This course provides an opportunity for individual coaching/mentoring in theatrical design and technology, acting, or directing. While structured according to the skill levels of individual students, the course is intended to provide advanced students with a master class for preparation of materials for application to graduate school or professional work.   McConnellIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.