NameSynonymShort TitleDescriptionMeeting DaysStart TimeEnd TimeFacultyArea ApprovalsComments
ART-107-00132445Web Design WorkshopThis course gives students the basic visual and technical skills for creating engaging websites. Students will take part in class exercises that will serve as the basis from which a larger website project will stem from. Effective use of color, imagery, and elements of design as well as issues of interactivity will all be addressed in this course. Software used will offer students an understanding of how different approaches to web development affect both the creation and display of content.M T W R F01:00PM03:30PMLukeIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meets 12:00-2:30pm on Fridays.
ART-125-00132465IrelandImage/InspiratnIRELAND: IMAGE AND INSPIRATION. This course is an immmersion in Irish culture, landscape and literature. Students will travel to Ireland and reside at Burren College of Art amid the inspiring landscape of the Western coast. Students will read and discuss Irish literature and visit the locations that inspired those texts. Students will respond to their reading and experiences through photography and creative writing. Students will learn basic digital photography and creative writing techniques. Each student will contribute a significant piece of writing and accompanying photographs to a class publication.   BriggsIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
BIO-107-00132424NeuroanatomyNEUROANATOMY: BRAIN, BODY, SELF. Where do we get a physical sense of ourselves? How do we control our bodies? Are "we" and "our bodies" distinct? How are brain and body linked? In this course, students will gain a three-dimensional understanding of nervous system structure and function. The course will include dissections, discussions, drawing (don't worry if you think you can't draw!), coloring, hands-on demonstrations, laboratory practical and reading-based exams, and a team presentation to the class. In the last week of the course, we will share hands-on demonstrations with children and other St. Peter-area community members.T W R F09:00AM11:30AMMarzIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
Lab meets 1:00pm - 2:30pm on MTW in NHS 324.
BIO-111-00132447Animals in Extreme EnvANIMALS IN EXTREME ENVIRONMENTS: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ECOLOGICAL ADAPTATIONS OF ANIMALS TO CHALLENGING ENVIRONMENTS. Some environments on Earth are considered "extreme" from the human perspective. Think about winter in Minnesota. Think about deserts in Africa. Think about the frozen continent of Antarctica. Yet, there are a variety of animals successfully living in those challenging environments. What are the unique adaptations of those animals? Are there any fundamental similarities? What makes those environments "extreme" to humans? In this course, we will explore these questions through in-class discussion, experiential learning in the laboratory, guest speakers, and field trips. You will also learn to develop your own hypothesis and design a project that tests the question you generate.      M T W R F09:00AM11:30AMKawarasakiIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $20.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
Lab meets 1:00-4:00pm on MWR in NHS 226.
BIO-128-00132425Biomolecular ResearchINTRODUCTION TO BIOMOLECULAR RESEARCH. You do not need to wait until graduate school to do scientific research! This course is for students in their first year to explore this exciting activity. It aims to provide a rich experience investigating original research questions at the interface of biology and chemistry, to explore collaborative research as a potential part of an education in science, and to prepare and encourage students to pursue additional research. Tutorials on project background, equipment use and procedures will be provided. We will read about and discuss the scientific process and research endeavor. Attention will be devoted to exploring scientific research as part of the career interests and vocations of those enrolled.M T W R F09:00AM04:00PMArnettIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Course fee: $55.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Permission Required. Open to First-Year &
Sophomores only.
CHE-215-00132426Chem Research MethodsRESEARCH METHODS IN CHEMISTRY. An in depth research experience is often a critical motivating factor for students that ultimately choose a career path in the sciences. This course will provide students with opportunities to gain experience in developing analytical methods, and applying them to solve real chemical, biological, and environmental problems. Each student will gain experience with modern chemical instrumentation used for chromatography and/or mass spectrometry. Students will also execute searches of the scientific literature, and present the results of their work both orally, and in writing.M T W R F08:30AM04:00PMStollIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
Mtg. time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch breaks.
Permission Required.
CHN-110-00132496Chinese Eco-Lit/FilmCHINESE ECOLOGICAL LITERATURE AND FILM. China's current environmental crisis is among the most complex in the world. China's land mass is nearly the same as that of the United States. However, its 1.4 billion people live within the eastern one-third of the country, creating tremendous environmental pressures in these areas. In addition to issues of air pollution, soil and water contamination, habitat degradation, and species extinction, China also confronts the larger, on-going problems of water scarcity in the north and flood conditions in the south. This course will explore how Chinese artists, writers, and filmmakers have responded to these situations. This course begins with the premise that environmental movements evolve discursively - with the language that shapes the understandings of the man-nature relationship, political calls for change, and even the interpretation of scientific findings. How have Chinese writers and artists shaped the discourse of the environment in their country? What values characterize a uniquely Chinese approach to the man-nature relationship? We will read short stories, a novel and watch several documentary and feature films. In addition, the course will also investigate artistic responses to the controversies surrounding the building of the Three Gorges Dam and the desertification of China's northern plains.M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMCannellaIEXGrading: ABCDF.
COM-113-00132481Social Impact of MediaTHE SOCIAL IMPACT OF MEDIA ON ADOLESCENT GIRLS. Adolescence, first recognized as a cultural construct at the beginning of the 20th century, is a stage of life between childhood and adulthood characterized by pubertal change, identity formation, social development, and the acquisition of experiences and credentials promoting entry to adult roles. This course employs critical media theory to examine mediated images directed toward adolescent girls ages 9-17. Major components of the course include an overview of representations of girls in the media, body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint, the influence of marketing moguls, and strategies for change. Coursework includes reading assignments, in-class discussion, and writing assignments.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMWolterIEXGrading: ABCDF.
CUR-220-00132482Musical UnderstandingThis course provides students with an understanding and appreciation of the nature and place of music in contemporary culture. Music is a rich source of diversity of cultural influences as well as musical periods, styles, and media. The composer's perspective, the performer's role and the listener's responsibility provide points of departure for considering the individual's contributions to music and communal reaction to differing types of music or musical developments. Students will be involved in activities such as listening to recorded performances of music, attending performances of music on and off campus, writing papers for class presentations, discussing special topics, and participating directly in musical performance.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMKnoepfelIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Not open to First-Year students.
Permission required. Waiting list.
E/M-103-00132427Economics in the MediaThis course will introduce students to many of the economic issues and debates which they will encounter in their every day lives. The course will use the tools of economics to provide a framework for analyzing and understanding such issues as Health Care Reform, CEO pay and performance, mandatory recycling programs, sweatshop labor, immigration reform and the role and responsibilities of the corporation. The course will combine a presentation of economic issues through a variety of media, including film and audio documentaries, with a discussion of the relevant economic theory and how the theory is used to understand these issues more thoroughly.M T W R F01:00PM03:30PMEstensonIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
E/M-104-00132542Personal FinanceDoes trying to understand your personal finances scare you? Credit cards. Savings accounts. Budgeting. Tax returns. This Personal Finance course we will cover these topics and much more to help prepare you to make solid personal financial decisions. The course will also cover smart choices on investments, retirement planning, and even making large purchases such as a car or home.M T W R F11:30AM02:30PMBowyerIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Lab meets in BH 303.
Permision Required. Wait List.
E/M-203-00132585Economics of ReligionThe economics of religion originated long ago with Adam Smith. However, the field of economics that studies religion has only begun to take shape in the last few decades and demonstrates the wide applicability of economics to other disciplines. In this course students will survey the existing literature on the economics of religion to better understand the extent to which economic models can explain various aspects of religion. Emphasis is on behavioral and organizational economic theories as they apply to particularly Western religions. Students also will explore the topics of religiosity, spiritual capital, and the evolution of religious organizational structures.M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMTerkun CastroIEXGrading: ABCDF.
E/M-305-00132557Online InvestingThe course is an overview of online resources for the individual investor covering all stages of the investment process from screening potential investments to monitoring an investment portfolio. The course emphasizes the development and actualization of a trading strategy to determine entry and exit points using stock charts and mathematical algorithms based on price and trading volume. The investment vehicles discussed are individual stocks, exchange traded funds, equity options, and E-mini futures contracts.M T W R F12:30PM03:00PMPetersonIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
EDU-267-00132468Peru: Service LearningEDUCATION, HEALTHCARE AND POVERTY IN PERU: A SERVICE LEARNING EXPERIENCE. This course provides students a service learning experience opportunity focusing on the impact of poverty on a country and how education and healthcare support can alleviate some of these adverse conditions. Students will live in dorms and provide service to this poverty-stricken area by teaching English in the school program or helping in the medical center and hospice. A cultural exploration to Machu Picchu will expand student understanding of the culture and history of Peru. Students will complete daily journals and participate in evening discussions based on readings about the country as well as issues of poverty. A final reflection paper will be required.   PittonIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 8-9 in MAT 102.
EDU-268-00132458Orientation to TeachingThis course is designed to help students assess their interests in teaching. The student spends one month working in an elementary or secondary school or other approved setting as a full-time teacher assistant. A journal, selected readings and on-line discussion provide opportunities for reflection during the experience in a school setting. Written assignments and attendance at a culminating retreat are required. Students attend an organizational meeting in the early fall to receive information regarding school placement options and course requirements. This course counts as one of a maximum of four internship credits allowed in the degree program.   VizenorIEX EXPGrading: Pass/Fail.
Permission Required.
EDU-396-00132459Middle Level Dir TchngMIDDLE LEVEL DIRECTED TEACHING. Four weeks of full-time supervised teaching at a cooperating middle school/junior high. This course provides a broad experience in the planning and directing of learning for middle level learners in the area of the student's endorsement.   SandquistIEX EXPGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
ENG-109-00132558Utopian YA Lit/FilmUTOPIAN YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE & FILM. Utopias practice the principle of hope, transforming hope into a blueprint for a possible future of dreams and fears. What elements of utopian literature are uniquely suited to Young Adult literature? What might explain the popularity of Young Adult utopian novels? Beginning with the text that put the word on the map, Utopia, we will consider how this text informs The Giver and The City of Ember. In addition, we will view films such as Wall-E or Star Trek. Students will shape the class by introducing utopias and constructing a blog to conribute to the academic conversation about utopian literature.M T W R F09:00AM11:30AMMooreIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Add'l. time for film viewing is req'd. on M or W.
ENG-110-00132559Dystopian YA Lit/FilmDYSTOPIAN YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE & FILM. Dystopias hold a mirror to societies' flaws; this class asks what those flaws are, and why they target a young adult audience. What elements of dystopian literature are suited to Young Adult literature? What might explain the popularity of Young Adult dystopian novels? Beginning with the iconic classics 1984, Brave New World, we will consider how these texts inform The Hunger Games and Divergent. In addition, we will view such films as The Matrix or Aeon Flux. Students will have the opportunity to shape the class by introducing dystopias and constructing a blog to contribute to the academic conversation about dystopian literature.M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMMooreIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Add'l. time for film viewing is req'd. on M or W.
ENG-134-00132428Once Upon a TimeONCE UPON A TIME: FAIRY TALES, FILMS & FICTION. Was the original tale of Little Red Riding Hood really about rape? Did Cinderella's stepsisters really cut off their toes to fit into the glass slipper? How did Disney change these original tales and why? What has happened to fairy tales in the 21st century? Students enrolling in this class will have the opportunity to read original fairy tales and their many adaptations and appropriations in full length novels, to screen films based on fairy tales, to hear guest speakers, to read literary criticism about the tales, to do both creative and scholarly writing, and possibly to do service-learning in the community. Our classes together will include discussions of the tales themselves, of films, and of the concept of literary intertextuality. We will read aloud our own versions of tales and make library visits. The class will conclude with a final exam.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMBaerIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission required. Waiting list.
ENV-225-00132583Intro Renewable EnergyINTRODUCTION TO RENEWABLE ENERGY. This course will explore the renewable energy technology and related topics in science and public policy. Field trips, laboratory exercises, problem solving (math at the high school algebra level) and lectures will cover a full range of renewable energy sources, including wind, solar and biomass, the rationale for their use, and the technology for taking advantage of these energy sources.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMDontjeIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $20.
Lab meets 1:30pm-4:00pm on TR.
FRE-112-00132448The French CaribbeanPERFORMING IDENTITIES: FRENCH CARIBBEAN LITERATURE, MUSIC, CINEMA AND FOOD. What is being Creole and French? In this course, students will be introduced to the rich diversity of the French Caribbean societies and cultures of Martinique and Guadeloupe. This experiential course will give students a new perspective of this region. Students will learn about their geography, history, literature, cinema, music and food and other important issues such as: slavery, colonization, Negritude, Creolite. We will see how to be Creole has become locally and globally synonymous of freedom, resistance and empowerment in a Colonial and Postcolonial context. Students will read and discuss assigned readings, make presentations and write research papers.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMBatesIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $10.
GEG-115-00132449Sports GeographyCRITICAL SPORTS GEOGRAPHY:IDENTITY, GLOBALIZATION, AND THE PRODUCTION OF URBAN SPACE. This course explores the local, regional, national, and global nature of professional sports. Furthermore, the course will explore the complex racial, gendered, and ethnic politics of sports. The impact of sports stadiums on the urban landscape as well as the increasing globalization of sports will be critically investigated in the course. To illustrate the content of the class, emphasis will be given to basketball, baseball, soccer, and hockey. The course requires attendance to sporting events in the area.M T W R F11:00AM01:00PMVillanuevaIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $50.
GEG-151-00132429Wilderness Rec/ResourceWILDERNESS: RECREATION AND RESOURCES. Why can't bison and cowboys get along? What happens to all the chairlift operators in Vail during the summer? Why is oil drilling in wilderness areas such a contentious issue? How will your local ski hill survive global climate change? This course is about wildlands, and the way we as human exploit them for personal enjoyment and economic gain. Whether it is the Kasota Prairie or Yellowstone, we will explore the places where we recreate, the economic and environmental impacts of our presence in wildlands, and the challenges land managers face when attempting to protect them for future generations.M T W R F11:00AM01:00PMBergstromIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required. Wait List.
GEO-101-00132553Dinosaurs & their FoodDinosaurs--terrible lizards--have inspired art, fiction, and science since the first bones were described in 1824. The history of discovery stretches back even further--perhaps to ancient Chinese times. This course will investigate the art, literature, and science of the Mesozoic Era--the Age of Dinosaurs. In order to understand how dinosaurs lived, this course will explore the ecology of the Mesozoic--both animals and plants. Students will conduct a project in which they prepare actual fossil material for display. Additionally, students will visit the Field Museum in Chicago to view fossils on display and behind the scenes.M T W R F10:30AM12:00PMChristensenIEXGrading: Student Option.
Course Fee: $100.
Lab meets 1:00pm-3:00pm on TR in NHS 123.
GRE-100-00132430Immersion Greek IThis course is an intensive introduction to ancient Greek and prepares students to go straight into second semester Greek. Taking this course will improve their understanding of how language works, enhance their English vocabulary, introduce them to Greek culture, and lay the groundwork for going on to read great works of literature, from Homer's poems through Plato to the New Testament. There will be daily homework and quizzes, a weekly test, and a final exam. Students will create active learning exercises (e.g. conversations, poems, songs, and games in Greek), and there will be extracurricular opportunities to appreciate Greek culture and cuisine.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMPancieraIEXGrading: ABCDF.
HES-102-00132440Begin TennisCourse objectives include developing basic tennis stroke skills, game skills, and gaining cognitive knowledge regarding tennis as a recreational lifetime activity.M W F08:30AM10:00AMCarlsonACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-105-00132441BadmintonThis course is designed to introduce and enhance the skills of the game, including strategies, scoring, and shots.M W F08:00AM09:30AMMoeACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
Permission required. Waiting list.
HES-105-00232442BadmintonThis course is designed to introduce and enhance the skills of the game, including strategies, scoring, and shots.M W F10:30AM12:00PMBanseACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-108-00132443VolleyballStudents are introduced to skills, rules, and offensive/defensive strategies associated with this lifetime activity. Participation improves fitness and skill development.M W F12:30PM02:00PMEckheartACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-116-00132596Weight TrainingStudents are introduced to skills, techniques, muscle physiology, and safety. After learning how to set up a personalo strength training program, students are better able to set goals to improve and maintain lifetime activity. Both free weights and machines are used.M W F10:30AM12:00PMEberhardtACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
 
HES-127-00132444Pilates ConditioningThis course will offer a mixture of Pilates, yoga and calisthenics training.M W F12:30PM02:00PMMoreACTGrading: Pass/Fail.
Only open to students who have not completed
their ACT requirement.
HES-242-00132466OlympicQuest:ScandaviaSCANDINAVIAN OLYMPIC QUEST: UNDERSTANDING SPORT AND LEISURE IN SWEDEN, NORWAY, DENMARK, AND FINLAND. Using a global, issues-oriented approach, this course will study sports, leisure and the Olympics, and their relationship to society and culture in Scandinavia. By participating, attending, and experientially reflecting on engagement within various cultural and societal sites throughout Scandinavia, students will critically explore the links that exist between sport and leisure and the major spheres of social life.   BanksIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
HES-318-00132544Sr January AT ClinicalJanuary Senior Athletic Training Clinical Lab This course provides athletic training students the opportunity to participate in clinical education, discuss evidence based practice, and become trained in the Graston Technique.   Momsen Grading: ABCDF.
Athletic Training majors only.
HIS-205-00132450Power, Protest, ChangePOWER, PROTEST, AND SOCIAL CHANGE SINCE THE 1950S. This course introduces students to the history of urban rebellions, freedom struggles, and protest movements in the U.S. since the 1950s. This course has two goals. First, it will introduce students to concepts and theories of social movements through the study of a selective history of political struggles in the U.S. Second, it will guide students to identify urgent social issues that we should address as a society and, through experiential learning, develop preliminary models, strategies, and a blueprint to carry out collective visions of participatory democracy.M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMVongIEXGrading: ABCDF.
HIS-217-00132431Digital HistoryHISTORY BYTES: HISTORY IN THE DIGITAL AGE. We live in a digital world filled with Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Wikipedia, and Wii. New technology is not just for entertainment, but can also prove useful for academics, creating new opportunities and new challenges for accessing and presenting research. As we embrace new technologies, will printed sources become artifacts of the past? Throughout this course we will discuss how technology influences the research and presentation of history. The course will culminate with the creation of group projects related to Gustavus history incorporating a technological component. Technological knowledge is not required, but may be beneficial.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMKrankingIEXGrading: ABCDF.
IDS-110-00132569Reading/Writing JazzREADING AND WRITING JAZZ.  This course will explore the nature and form of Jazz music through listening then reading and writing about the music. Students will critically listen to a full spectrum of Jazz music on records, CDs, and Internet videoes. Students will also read some of the best examples of writing about Jazz, written in multiple literary genres, which may include essays, critical reviews, poetry, fiction and non-fiction prose. Students will create their own writing on and about Jazz. Students will be asked to write free expressive, creative, as well as critical pieces about the nature and form of this music.M T W R F12:30PM02:30PMBryantIEXGrading: ABCDF.
MCS-358-00132432Math Model BuildingMATHEMATICAL MODEL BUILDING. An introductory study of the formulation of mathematical models to represent, predict, and control real-world situations, especially in the social and biological sciences. The course will use ideas from calculus, linear algebra, and probability theory to describe processes that change in time in some regular manner, which may be deterministic or stochastic. Typical topics are Markov and Poisson processes, discrete and continuous equations of growth, and computer simulation. In addition, students will work on their own mathematical modeling projects.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMLoFaroIEXGrading: ABCDF.
MLC-106-00132434Immigrant IssuesIMMIGRANTS: CHANGING THE FACE OF AMERICA. A course designed to offer the opportunity to explore the various issues related to the immigrants in their own communities. This intensive class will examine the economic and social climates of the immigrants' regions of origin that gave way to their migration to the United States. Our emphasis will be on the Mexican, Somali and Hmong populations. We will also discuss the impact of immigration on jobs, wages, education, health and social services. Coursework will include selected readings, documentaries, lectures, student presentations and fieldtrips.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMTaylorIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $10.
MLC-115-00132435Contemp Chinese FilmCONTEMPORARY CHINA THROUGH FILM. This course introduces to students contemporary Chinese society and culture through watching, discussing, and writing about major films from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. We will explore important social, political, and cultural issues and phenomena, such as Cultural Revolution, Women?s status, ethnic minorities, rural migrants, martial arts films, and popular culture. By the end of the course, students will reach a better understanding of the social, political, and cultural reality of contemporary China. They will also develop skills in analyzing films.M T W R F10:30AM01:30PMShanIEXGrading: ABCDF.
MUS-156-00132566Gustavus ChoirA mixed-voice ensemble of approximately seventy members which studies and performs significant historical and contemporary choral repertoire. A concert tour is conducted each year, including an international tour every fourth year. Open by audition.M T W R F04:00PM06:00PMAune Grading: Student Option.
MUS-156-00232567Gustavus ChoirA mixed-voice ensemble of approximately seventy members which studies and performs significant historical and contemporary choral repertoire. A concert tour is conducted each year, including an international tour every fourth year. Open by audition.M T W R F04:00PM06:00PMAune Grading: Student Option.
MUS-165-00132471Orchestra in E EuropeGUSTAVUS WIND ORCHESTRA IN EASTERN EUROPE. This a course focused on the aural study and performance of selected works from the great wind orchestra repertoire. The performances will be presented to eight audiences in Eastern Europe. The countries of contemporary Eastern Europe are products of complex internal factors, long-term historical trends, and external developments. Our fifteen-day preparation (on campus) will involve extensive rehearsal study and preparation (as a whole group, in sectionals, and in individual practice) necessary for the performances. In addition, through daily lectures, videos, guest presentations, and guided listening sessions, we will explore the musical heritage of the areas to be visited in Europe, along with examining the history and cultures that both connect and distinguish these countries. Our conversation about these themes will continue while performing in Eastern Europe. Students will keep a journal and write a reflective paper discussing their experience of being a performing musician on tour and of sharing music with these audiences. Participation is mandatory at daily rehearsals, sectionals, and the companion course; enrollment is determined by audition. Except in an unusual circumstance, the course is limited to those persons who were enrolled in MUS 165 during the 2013 Fall Semester.M T W R F08:30AM10:00AMNimmoIEXRehearsal times to be arranged.
Grading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
NDL-00-00132587UMAIE-Brazil     JAN IEXPermission required.
T4208
NDL-00-00232588UMAIE-Ecuador/Galapagos     JAN IEXPermission required.
T4209
NDL-00-00332589UMAIE-Fiji     JAN IEXPermission required.
T4202
NDL-00-00432590UMAIE-Hawaii     JAN IEXPermission required.
T4214
NDL-00-00532591UMAIE-India Rel/Culture     JAN IEXPermission required.
T4220
NDL-00-00632592UMAIE-Israel     JAN IEXPermission required.
T4207
NDL-00-00732593UMAIE-Rome     JAN IEXPermission Required.
T4201
NDL-068-00132461Career Explor PreregistrationThis is a required preregistration for those students who intend to pursue a career exploration during January but have not finalized their placement at the time of registration. Only preregistered students will be eligible for the final registration in a career exploration.    IEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Not open to first-year students.
NDL-100-00132436Film NoirTHE HISTORY AND ART OF FILM NOIR.  Film noir was a film movement that often emphasized moral ambiguity and sexual motivation. This course will trace the history of this movement from its literary and cinematic inception, its peak during the "classic period", to the neo-noir style of the modern era. In addition to the historical and artistic aspects of these films, the cultural implications of the movement will also be explored. This course is designed for people who love film. Course evaluation instruments include two exams, written work, and the group creation of a film noir short. Several books covering aspects of film noir history and analysis will be assigned.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMSaulnierIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Also meets 1:30-4:00pm on TR for film viewing.
NDL-104-00132483Army LeadershipFOUNDATIONS OF ARMY LEADERSHIP. There are many well-proven Army techniques for leadership, personal development, physical well-being, values, and ethics which can be used every day and which may be of interest to students, regardless of major. Others may be interested in this subject because of connections they have with friends or family in the military. This course is designed to introduce these ideas to those with little or no previous experience with the concepts of Army leadership and officership. In the classroom you will be exposed to the basics of the Army system and what it is like to be a U.S. Army officer. Students in the course will have required reading assignments and be expected to participate in classroom discussion and class activities. Every student will give an oral presentation, write a paper, keep daily logs, and take a weekly test.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMBohlIEXGrading: ABCDF.
NDL-107-00132451PseudoscienceADVENTURES IN PSEUDOSCIENCE AND SKEPTICISM. Have you ever questioned a strange experience? Or the many exaggerated claims in the media? We will explore pseudoscience and skepticism, addressing the most mysterious, controversial, and contentious issues in science and skepticism. We will build a toolkit of critical thinking and reasoning skills, such as: identifying logical fallacies, understanding why our brains are susceptible to false claims and illusions, evaluating sources cited, and more. This unique course utilizes in-class demonstrations, videos, magic, illusions, and examples from pop culture. You will take away a scientific way of thinking, which will change the lense through which you access the world.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMBergIEXGrading: ABCDF.
NDL-116-00132554Analyzing JapanUnderstanding another culture is a cumulative yet never-ending process, and especially if you are fascinated by or feel threatened by Japan, this course may be for you. For one month we will immerse ourselves in "things Japanese," as we explore the foundations of Japanese culture through an analysis of almost everything from history to sumo wrestling. Japanese language ability is not a prerequisite, although we will use a limited number of Japanese terms throughout the course to introduce cultural concepts.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMLeitchIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $20.
NDL-118-00132452Unexpected EventsUNEXPECTED AND TRANSFORMATIVE EVENTS. Bob Dylan goes electric. Steve Jobs introduces the Iphone. A wave of political demonstrations topples a regime. This course examines how contemporary philosophy has tried to understand this idea of the unforeseen and highly impactful event, an idea that we will approach in terms of novelty, the encounter, the other, rupture, revolution, inspiration and innovation. Particular attention will be given to recent philosophies of the event, and popular writers such as Malcolm Gladwell. Student presentations will analyze inventions, historical occurrences, personal incidents, scientific discoveries, films, paintings, or literary works that serve as exemplars for an unexpected and transformative event.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMBakiIEXGrading: ABCDF.
NDL-128-00132453Current Ag IssuesCURRENT ISSUES IN AGRICULTURE. The global human population has now reached over 7 billion and is projected to reach 10 billion by 2050. How will we feed all of these people? Does what I eat matter? What are the implications of our current agricultural practices? This course will focus on the biological, political, economic and ethical implications agriculural practices including biotechnology, organic and conventional farming practices, global climate change, farming in an urban landscape and community based agricultural programs. We will explore these issues through in-class discussions and debates, lectures, guest speakers, film, and field trips.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMKochsiekIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission required. Waiting list.
NDL-170-00132467Cuba Religion CulturesRELIGIOUS CULTURES OF CUBA. We will travel to Cuba, where we will study the diversity of Cuba's religious cultures. These include the African-based Yoruba religion (santeria), Catholicism, and several branches of evangelical Protestantism, as well as Judaism and a small but growing Islamic presence. This class will mainly be focused on the interaction between santeria and Christian religious practices. Through readings, church visits, discussions, invited speakers, concerts, dance performances, and lectures we will examine the history of Cuban religions and religious identities, look at how religion is practiced today, and study how contemporary religious sects work to serve their communities.       RaoIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 6-10 in BH 313
at 8:00am-5:00pm.
Mtg. time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch breaks.
Meets until 2:30pm on Friday.
NDL-206-00132560American WarfareTHE EVOLUTION OF AMERICAN WARFARE. This course is designed to provide an overview of American military history from the Revolutionary War to the present, with emphasis on the Post World War I era. It examines the cause, conduct, consequences, and historical threads of military conflict. Students will be able to employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition; examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures; use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories; and develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues.M T W R F12:30PM02:20PMBohlIEXGrading: ABCDF.
NDL-228-00132472Spanish Sport & CultrThrough a variety of learning opportunities--playing soccer, discussions with experts on sport, readings that prepare us for the experiential parts of the course, and reflective journal writing--we will learn how sport, in part, defines Spanish culture. We will also see how sport allows for diverse communities to come together. Visiting with coaches, players, community leaders, and others, and viewing a range of sporting events will allow participants in the course to gain a better appreciation for the dynamic interplay between sport, history and culture.   MiddletonIEXGrading: Student Option.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
Meets on campus Jan. 6-10 in LUN 207
at 8:00am-5:00pm.
Mtg. time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch breaks.
Meets until 2:30pm on Friday.
NDL-243-00132555ForensicsThis course is focused on participation in extracurricular forensic activities (speech and debate). Forensics involves preparation for and participation in speaking activities in environments other than the classroom. Students are expected to engage in intercollegiate forensics tournaments. Students may participate in public speaking or interpretation of literature.M T W R F01:00PM04:00PMKadlecekIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Meets 11:30am-2:30pm on Fridays.
NDL-250-00132470One Voice in IndiaWITH ONE VOICE IN INDIA. This course is designed for students who are interested in exploring health in India from a holistic perspective that regards one?s physical, emotional and spiritual wellbeing as intricately enmeshed. Students will interact directly with people in rural and urban health care settings, as well as spend time being part of a rural village?s daily life. Because music plays an important role in Indian culture and is intentionally used as a healing therapy, students will have numerous opportunities to join the people of India in singing favorite Indian songs. Students will write daily narratives that reflect on the meaning of this experience. Using Van Manen?s phenomenological approach, students will explore the lived experience of the role that music plays in creating physical, emotional and spiritual wellbeing amongst Indians.   ZustIEXGrading: ABCDF.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
NUR-301-00132561Critical CareCRITICAL CARE: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH. This course is designed for students who are interested in an interdisciplinary approach to create optimal outcomes for patients and families in the critical care environment. Together, students will develop advanced knowledge and skills necessary to promote holistic healing in the critical care environment. Students will learn to collaborate with a variety of team members to deliver safe and effective care to patients and families undergoing multiple stressors. Emphasis will be placed on the development of appropriate knowldege and skills necesasary to care for patients experiencing critical care episodes. Students will participate in a critical care rotation in a high fidelity patient simulation center located off campus.M T W R F10:30AM01:20PMStadickIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee not to exceed $800.
Permission Required.
PHY-210-00132437Sci Programming in CSCIENTIFIC PROGRAMMING IN C AND MATLAB. This course will provide an introduction to the C and Matlab computer languages and to their application to problems in physics, engineering, applied mathematics and simulations of systems. C, or common relatives such as Java and C++, continues to be one of the most commonly used computer languages. In recent years, a growing number of users in science and engineering have been using Matlab as a programming language. There will be required textbook readings, homework assignments, in-class exams, and a final project, in which students will be encouraged to develop software in an area of interest.M T W R F09:00AM12:00PMHuberIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
POL-115-00132454MN Politics & Govt.MINNESOTA POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT. This course provides an introduction to politics and government in the state of Minnesota. The course focuses on political institutions (the governor, state legislature, and state court system), political participation by citizens, and public policy in Minnesota. Class activities include guest speakers working in Minnesota politics and government, a field trip to the Capitol, and a community engagement project related to public policy in Minnesota.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMKnutsonIEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission required. Waiting list.
PSY-242-00132543Forensic PsychologyThis course will examine the application of psychology to the criminal and civil justice systems, with specific focus on relevant aspects of social and clinical psychology. We will learn about various approaches to the psychological study of the law, psychologists' roles within the criminal and civil legal system, moral dilemmas within the law, police psychology, eyewitness testimony, expert witness testimony, evaluation of criminal suspects, competency to stand trial, insanity pleas, jury selection and decision making, civil commitment, sentencing, and prison psychology. As a result of self-direction and personal interest, students will gain an understanding of subspecialty areas through individual projects.M T W R01:30PM04:00PM IEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
To be placed on the waiting
list
REL-111-00132570Religion & FilmCINEMA AND THE SACRED: RELIGION AND FILM.  This course explores the use of film to study religion and employs religious themes to study film. We will use films as a platform for asking questions about various dimensions of religion and the religious. And conversely, we will use images, metaphors, and teachings found in religion to discuss the layers and elements visually and audibly portrayed on screen. Through different critical approaches, this course will examine how religion, as variously defined, pervades the modern cinema and how one may engage in dialogue with this phenomenon.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMPetersenIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
REL-203-00132455Atheism & TheismATHEISM AND THEISM IN MODERN THOUGHT. While the so-called "New Atheism" has been rhetorically persuasive, it is substantively shallow, often attacking views that no respectable theologian or philosopher has held for the last 200 years. The real issues were explored much more carefully in European philosophy and theology in the 19th and early 20th centuries. We will examine the work of important antitheists and nontheists of that age, particularly Feuerbach and Nietzsche, and their serious theistic respondents. We will also study modern formulations of Buddhist nontheism. On this basis, we should be able to better assess both the contemporary debates and our own views.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMPaulIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission required. Waiting list.
REL-253-00132439Changing the WorldCHANGING THE WORLD: JUSTICE, ACTION, AND THE MEANING OF LIFE. "Who am I, what really matters, and how can I make a difference in the world?" This course will help participants wrestle with "Big Questions" like these by focusing on various theologies, philosophies, and spiritualities of the meaning and purpose of life, vocation and calling, action and contemplation, identity and otherness, peace and justice. We will draw upon a wide range of resources and approaches, including fiction and film, music and service, to fuel the conversation. Singer-songwriter Neal Hagberg (a Gustavus alum and director of the Tennis & Life Camp) will be with us in residency for part of the month to explore the intersections of creativity, calling, and composing an undivided life. Frequent writing and extensive class discussion, as well as a community-based learning component focusing on "story, place, and community," will assist us in grappling with the ideals and realities of social action and servant-leadership. Regular class sessions and ongoing relationships with members of the St. Peter community will be supplemented by day-long immersions with various organizations in the Twin Cities. A two-day, overnight, off-campus retreat will kick off our month together.M T W R F08:30AM12:00PMJohnsonIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Course Fee: $150.
Permission Required.
Meeting time includes Daily Sabbath break.
S/A-108-00132456HBO's Social ScienceHBO'S "SOCIAL SCIENCE FICTION": CRITICALLY EXAMINING "THE WIRE" AND THE CRISIS OF AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS. Unlike any work of popular culture or real-life documentary, HBO's fictional television series "The Wire" faithfully exposes the tragedies of institutional failure and urban poverty in the forgotten America. By viewing and discussing the entire series, students will gain a comprehensive and unique understanding of the "war on drugs," daily operations of gangs, overloaded prison systems, political corruption, disappearing blue-collar employment, and savage inequalities of the education system. Complemented by accessible and gripping academic texts, this course uncovers the complexities of the causes of urban crime and poverty, motivating students to seek out new and innovative solutions for social change.M T W R F12:30PM03:00PMSeymourIEXPermission Required. Waiting List.
Grading: ABCDF.
Meets until 2:30pm on Fridays.
S/A-109-00132457Pop Music as CommunityPOPULAR MUSIC AS COMMUNITY. In this course we will explore the impact that popular music has on us as individuals and as communities. By listening to music and by participating in various musical cultures, we inadvertently participate in the expression of community. Taking a sociological approach towards popular music means that we will want to examine what community is and then consider how it expresses itself through music as a particular cultural practice. Therefore, students are invited to bring their own interest in various genres of music to explore what listening to music means to them and to consider what it means to society as a whole.M T W R F11:00AM01:00PMSylviaIEXGrading: ABCDF.
S/A-240-00132438Anth of SomaliaTELLING SOMALIA'S STORY: FROM PIRATES AND WAR TO RAPPERS AND BEYOND. This course will explore a range of images and ideas about Somalia that have emerged since the beginning of the Somali civil war in 1991. We will be looking at and analyzing films featuring the Somali civil war, at news and media images that capture the civil war, the pirates, and other political and politicized internal and external events and interventions, and later how musicians and other community leaders like K'naan are demanding and creating new ideas about the country, the conflict, and the future. Finally, we will be learning about the Somali community organizations and activities in and around Minnesota. We will explore the many ways, the Somali community has both built up resources to support Somalis living in the area, but also how they are involved in local and regional politics, events, and so on.M T W R F10:30AM12:30PMJacobsenIEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission required. Waiting list.
T/D-107-00132571January ProductionJANUARY PLAY PRODUCTION. This course is an intensive four-week production workshop culminating in performances early in February. The work is selected annually and is part of the production season of the Theatre and Dance Department. In alternate years, a musical is produced in conjunction with the Department of Music. The daily schedule may include some combination of acting, singing, dance or instrumental rehearsals as well as scenery and costume construction. Performers and musicians may also be assigned to production crews. There will be opportunities to discuss the work as it progresses with the directors and designers to gain insight into the theatrical process. Students wishing to perform must audition in late October or early November. Limited spaces are availabe for students interested only in working on technical crews, and they must interview with the Technical Director in October or November and register for T/D-211, 212, or 213. Performers and musicians must be available for rehearsals and performances in February.M T W R F10:30AM05:00PMSehamIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00-10:00pm.
T/D-111-00132564Scene/Props PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit. Permission of instructor is required.M T W R F  WilkensIEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission Required.
T/D-112-00132563Light/Sound PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F  WilkensIEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission Required.
T/D-113-00132572Costume PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:00PMMcConnellIEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission Required.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00-10:00pm.
T/D-115-00132573Asstnt Stage MngrThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:00PMOliveIEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission Required.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00-10:00pm.
T/D-115-00232574Asstnt Stage MngrThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F  WilkensIEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission Required.
T/D-120-00132556Body StoriesThis course explores the multi-faceted relationship between the body and the mind. Activities are designed to explore how societal pressures combine with individual personal histories to mold bodies and shape attitudes toward bodies. Class will begin with a morning movement session. Afternoon sessions will used to learn about, and experientially explore, the systems of the body and discuss the societal issues that impact perceptions of the body. Personal stories, guided visualization, spontaneous writing assignments, and structured movement explorations will be utilized to more accurately understand our bodies' structure and function, and to integrate external information with internal experience.M T W R F10:30AM12:00PMRusinkoIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
Also meets 1:30pm-3:30pm on MTWR in FAC 223.
T/D-211-00132576Scene/Props PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:30PMOliveIEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission Required.
T/D-211-00232575Scene/Props PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:00PMWilkensIEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission Required.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00-10:00pm.
T/D-212-00132562Light/Sound PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F  WilkensIEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission Required.
T/D-213-00132577Costume PracticumThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:00PMMcConnellIEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission Required.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00-10:00pm.
T/D-215-00132578Stage ManagementThis course provides the student with practical experience with technical production. May be repeated for credit.M T W R F10:30AM05:00PMSehamIEXGrading: Student Option.
Permission Required.
Add'l. rehearsal at 7:00-10:00pm.
T/D-244-00132568Ireland Gaiety ActingStudents will study Irish drama and the craft of acting at the Gaiety School of Acting, Ireland's premiere drama school. Acting classes in the morning are complemented by lectures, workshops, and seminars in the afternoon. The program includes organized museum visits, and theatre performances three evenings each week. At a final performance, students will present scenes from Irish plays to the staff and students of the Gaiety School.   MacCarthyIEXGrading: Pass/Fail.
TRAVEL COURSE-Permission Required.
T/D-372-00132565Adv Creative ExpADVANCED CREATIVE EXPERIENCE.  This course provides an opportunity for individual coaching/mentoring in theatrical design and technology, acting, or directing. While structured according to the skill levels of individual students, the course is intended to provide advanced students with a master class for preparation of materials for application to graduate school or professional work.M T W R F  WilkensIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
T/D-372-00232595Adv Creative ExpADVANCED CREATIVE EXPERIENCE.  This course provides an opportunity for individual coaching/mentoring in theatrical design and technology, acting, or directing. While structured according to the skill levels of individual students, the course is intended to provide advanced students with a master class for preparation of materials for application to graduate school or professional work.M T W R F09:30AM04:30PMMcConnellIEXGrading: ABCDF.
Permission Required.
Mtg time includes Daily Sabbath & lunch break.