Athletic Hall of Fame

The Gustavus Adolphus College Hall of Fame was established in 1978 at which time 19 "Charter Members" were inducted either as coaches or as athletes. As of the fall of 2017, 313 individuals (289 athletes, 15 coaches and 9 benefactors) have been elected to the Hall of Fame.

The beautiful Hall of Fame room on the second floor of the Lund Center was originally partially endowed by the families of both Dwight Holcombe's (the only father/son combination holding membership in the Hall). The hardwood plaque upon which the individual plates are permanently displayed was donated by the family of former football coach and Hall of Fame member Jocko Nelson, who passed away in 1978.

Amy McCrea Morrell

Tennis

Inducted: 2009

A three-time All-American in both singles and doubles, Amy McCrea Morrell played #1 singles and #1 doubles on the 1990 Gustavus women's tennis team that won the NCAA Championship. It was (and still is) the first and only Gustavus women's team to win a NCAA National Title. Morrrell was Gusties top player during (arguably) the most successful four-year period in the history of the program, as the team posted a record of 66-20 overall and 26-3 in the MIAC. She helped Gustavus win four conference titles and finish fourth at the NCAA Championships in 1989, first in 1990, and second in 1991. Morrell, a three-time NCAA qualifier in both the NCAA singles and doubles tournaments, is one of only two Gustavus players to have ever won the ITA Midwest Regional Singles Title three times (1988, 1989, and 1990). She completed her career with an overall record of 91-25 in singles and 87-28 in doubles.

After graduating in 1991 with majors in health fitness and health education, Morrell accepted a position as a tennis teaching professional with Northwest Swim and Racquet Clubs in the Twin Cities. She taught and coached tennis for five years and then began a career in pharmaceutical sales first with Pfizer and then with Bristol Myers. In 2000, after the birth of her first child, Morrell left Bristol Myers to focus on her family. She has returned to teaching and coaching tennis and running summer camps in addition to being a stay-at-home mom. Amy and her husband Kelly ('90), live in Spicer, Minnesota with their daughters, Lydia and Alyssa.